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5 results for The State Vol. 3 Issue 9, July 1935
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Record #:
15376
Author(s):
Abstract:
Folks living in the mountains of western North Carolina were portrayed in a romantic light of simpler people living a simpler life. Classic stereotypes were of tall, bearded men hunting, fishing, and making moonshine while their barefoot wives tended to house and home. In this piece, a different perspective is given about those living in the mountains of western North Carolina and that in fact the population was educated, living in homes and not just cabins, and had a greater grasp of the world beyond the mountains.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 9, July 1935, p6-7, 22, il
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Record #:
15377
Abstract:
Mount Mitchell, some 40 miles north of Asheville, is the tallest peak in eastern America and its forest was over-harvested in the late 19th- and early 20th-centuries. The 1914 state legislature passed regulations to cease logging and promote a conservation plan for the mountain. Mount Mitchell's development plans 21 years later included roads, reforestation programs, and a game refuge.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 9, July 1935, p9, 21, il
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Record #:
15750
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Tryon was a professional soldier and governor of the North Carolina colony on the eve of the American Revolution. Almost immediately following his arrival, he had to deal with resistance to the Stamp Act, which was finally repealed to head off bloodshed. Later, citizens, known as Regulators, banded together in armed resistance to excessive taxation. Tryon led the troops that put them down in 1771. After six years of strife and turmoil, the King named him Governor of New York. Although citizens were glad to see him go, Tryon's lasting monument in the state was the magnificent Palace in New Bern, which served as a state house as well as a home for governors.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 9, July 1935, p8
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Record #:
15749
Abstract:
Theodosia Burr Alston was the daughter of Aaron Burr, who served as Thomas Jefferson's vice president. On December 30, 1812, she sailed from Georgetown, South Carolina for New York. The ship never arrived and is thought to have vanished mysteriously off the Outer Banks. Local lore suggests that she was the victim of piracy. Information in the History of the Tuttle Family, to whom she was related, sheds some new light on the mystery.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 9, July 1935, p2, 22
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Record #:
15751
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seay describes the peach industry in the Sandhills. Twenty-five years ago land was hardly worth anything there, but growing peaches has changed all that. J. Van Lindley of Greensboro is credited with having planted the first commercial orchard there in 1892, but it has been only in the last decade that the industry has developed. Over two hundred varieties of peaches grow in the country. The Elberta, Georgia Belle, and the Hilly are the most widely-grown varieties in the Sandhills.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 9, July 1935, p20, 22
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