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4 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 7, Sept 1961
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Record #:
12682
Author(s):
Abstract:
Due to its isolation, Pamlico is North Carolina's least known county. Bordered by the Pamlico and Neuse Rivers, possessing no bridges over the two large bodies of water, colonial North-South travel typically took place inland thus by-passing Pamlico. In order to facilitate knowledge of the county's resources, a travel guide lists useful streams, beaches, schools, and camps for the North Carolina traveler.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 7, Sept 1961, p16-25, il
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Record #:
12680
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolinians played witness to a great hoax perpetrated in 1883 by Dr. G. W. Blacknall, Pulaski Cowper, and Col. Fred Olds, all from Raleigh. The gentlemen penned a story of the rescue of a small child who had been carried out to sea via a cluster of balloons. The story was published by the News & Observer, causing great controversy.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 7, Sept 1961, p9-10, il
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Record #:
12683
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pamlico County has three large rivers forming borders at its top and bottom, the Pamlico and Neuse Rivers, with one river in the middle known as the Bay River. Statistics of these rivers list their drainage areas, depth, and tributaries. Further statistics list resources abounding in these rivers, as well as population estimates back to 1880.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 7, Sept 1961, p27-28, il, por
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Record #:
12681
Author(s):
Abstract:
Music was as much a part of the Moravians' religions life as prayer, and of all their traditions, music is one of the oldest and deepest seated. Several Moravians that came to America knew and worked with the leading musicians of the time. By 1746, the Moravians in Bethlehem were using an organ to accompany their singing.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 7, Sept 1961, p13-14, por
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