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5 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961
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Record #:
12735
Abstract:
The Great Dismal Swamp spreads over six counties in Virginia and North Carolina--nearly 1,000 square miles of water, timber, and occasional wild animals. The inundated area has been reduced more than 50 percent from its original 2,200 square miles since early 18th century. Currently, Washington's Forest, Inc. is working 24 hours a day to drain the swamp, building over 40 miles of canals.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961, p8-9, 20, il, por
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Record #:
12738
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tales of Welsh-Speaking Indians recur in manuscript records and early accounts of the settlement of this country. The Welsh record of an expedition fitted out in 1162 by Prince Madoc is well known, and many accept he discovered America. The first report from America on the discovery of Welsh-Speaking Indians came from Rev. Morgan Jones who encountered them along the Pamlico River in eastern North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961, p16, il
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Record #:
12733
Abstract:
One of the outstanding literary characters associated with the history of Carolina is Edgar Wilson (Bill) Nye, who died in February 1896. Born in Shirley, Maine in 1850, Nye gave up law to become a writer, moving Henderson County in 1886. It was during these years that Nye wrote many famous works, including history of the United States, the Art of Lecturing, and Guest at Ludlow.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961, p23-24, il
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Record #:
12734
Abstract:
Old Dan Tucker, subject of the song sung through the middle of the 18th-century, was no myth. Dan Tucker was a hearty man, beloved by his neighbors in Randolph County. Born in London in 1720, Tucker came to America at six years old with his parents who settled in Bath, eventually becoming a farmer and hunter.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961, p11, 20
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Record #:
13450
Abstract:
Johns Hopkins University established a seaside biology laboratory in Beaufort in 1880, long before the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries created their biological station. An account of this work is found in the 20 November, 1880 issue of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, documenting the existence of the laboratory and the variety of sea life found in Beaufort waters.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 14, Dec 1961, p12-13, il
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