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4 results for The State Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1955
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Record #:
13057
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's newest county, Avery, has had a history of isolation as a frontier landscape. The first permanent settler to Avery County, Samuel Bright, came in 1774, followed by a slow and steady stream of intrepid men, who built their homes on the hillsides. The area grew with this migration but the Civil War isolated the area again as access to news, ideas, and education were limited. The area was slow to recover, but the discovery of mica in 1870 became an important factor in what is now Avery. Income has also come from the county's substantial woodlands and the good roads have brought in jobs and tourism. Despite the impact of highways, tourism, mining, education, and nearby jobs, the area remains rural and agricultural in nature, but whose geographical isolation is now considered beautiful, rather than ugly.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1955, p15-21, map, f
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Record #:
13055
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hugh Morton, born in 1921, inherited some unique properties: Grandfather Mountain and Fort Fisher. Born into a long line of business and development adventurers, Hugh joined the army in 1943 as a Signal Corps photographer. Hugh came back from the war injured, following the death of his father, Julian, and inherited sizable family debt. But Hugh married and began personally pouring money into the development of Grandfather Mountain; he built a road to the top, opened trails and hung a mile-high swing bridge between the peaks. As the tourism to Grandfather Mountain grows, so does the public persona of Hugh Morton, supporting festivals and associations, and gaining recognition for his good deeds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1955, p8-10, 14, f
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Record #:
13056
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tweetsie was the nickname given the East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railway, which ran between Boone and Johnson City until 1940. The Tweetsie negotiated 66 miles of track carrying almost anything from chestnuts to iron ore. In 1946 the rail was taken up for scrap during the war, but some of her legacy remains as Gene Autry added the last engine to his collection and at least two box cars serve as refreshment stands and diners.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1955, p12-13, f
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Record #:
15636
Author(s):
Abstract:
In an excerpt from his 1848 book, Letters from the Alleghenies, Lanman describes his visit to Roan and Grandfather mountains in western North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 2, June 1955, p10
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