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8 results for The State Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1954
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Record #:
13162
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Abstract:
Containing the largest network of inland waters in the United States, North Carolina additionally claims 320 miles of Atlantic shoreline. Including sounds, lagoons, estuaries, rivers, canals, slues, coves, and inlets, North Carolina waters are constantly altered by erosion, sedimentation, storms, and dredging.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1954, p4-5, 71, il
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Record #:
13163
Abstract:
Located near the Virginia-North Carolina state lines, Currituck has been explored and inhabited since the 18th-century. Experiencing topographical changes pertaining to the opening and closing of ocean inlets, the waters of Currituck sound have changed from salt to fresh numerous times.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1954, p6-8, il
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Record #:
13165
Abstract:
The only river between the Hudson and the Savannah reaching the Atlantic Ocean without being intercepted by a sound, the Scotman's River is North Carolina's most formidable. Comprising the largest lying drainage basin within North Carolina (8,570 square miles), the Scotsman's River is 320 miles long.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1954, p43-44, il
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Record #:
13164
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Abstract:
Reproduced from Photostats of a copy owned by the Department of Archives and History, this copy of Mouzon's map from 1775 depicts North Carolina's eastern territories as they were at the end of the 18th-century.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1954, p37, map
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Record #:
15703
Abstract:
Roanoke Island is the place where North Carolina's five great sounds meet. In the north the Albemarle flows into the Currituck Sound. The water then moves into either the Roanoke or the Croatan Sound as it passes on either side of the island, and finally merges at the south end with the Pamlico Sound. An individual taking a boat ride around the island can truthfully say that in one day he or she has sailed through the state's five sounds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1954, p17-18, 69, il
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Record #:
15705
Abstract:
The Cape Lookout area is equipped by nature and man for enjoyment with convenient waterways, bridges, docks, piers, accommodations, recreation areas, and points of interest. Among the places to visit are Morehead City, Beaufort Inlet, Shackleford Banks, Harker's Island, Cape Lookout Lighthouse, and Drum Inlet.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1954, p29, 31, 33, 35-36, il
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Record #:
15702
Abstract:
With the exception of Long Island Sound, Pamlico Sound, at 1,700 square miles and reaching over eighty miles in length, is the East Coast's largest sound. This article describes the sound and a number of towns located along it, including Stumpy Point, Engelhard, Swam Quarter, and Germantown.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1954, p21, 23, 66-67, il
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Record #:
15704
Abstract:
This article contains information on the towns lying on the south shore of the Pamlico River. As it winds through the Coastal Plain on its way to the sound, the river cuts a channel four to ten feet deep. The south shore is not as populated as the north.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 3, July 1954, p25-26, il
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