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5 results for The State Vol. 22 Issue 16, Jan 1955
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Record #:
13325
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Abstract:
This New Year's Eve, around 20 Gaston County residents will spend between 16 and 18 hours travelling from door to door, serenading friends and family with a salute of musket fire. Loaded with black powder for a guaranteed loud and smoky salutation, the New Year Shooters are carrying out a German Tradition numbering some 200 years in practice.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 16, Jan 1955, p10-11, 41, il, por
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Record #:
13326
Author(s):
Abstract:
Containing brief histories of: William H. Jones, Cpl. Seth L. Weld, Second Lt. Samuel I. Parker, Pvt. Robert L. Blackwell, Sgt. Ray E. Eubanks, First Lt. Charles Murray, Jack Lucas, Pfc. Bryant H. Womack, Jerry K. Crump, and P.F.C Charles George, this article recognizes native North Carolinians receiving Congressional medals of honor.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 16, Jan 1955, p12, 40, por
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Record #:
13328
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Louis L. Vine, a young veterinary practitioner from Chapel Hill, operated on several hundred canines with defective ear lobes. An hour long process known as the ear-pointing operation is the best developed surgery for animals in need of plastic surgery.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 16, Jan 1955, p15, 36, por
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Record #:
13327
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Abstract:
North Carolina's greatest game bird, the Ruffed Grouse, also referred to as a pheasant, is a forest dwelling creature considered to be the state's most omnivorous fowl. The first of a two part series published by the state, Tom Alexander examines attributes and characteristics of this unpredictable bird.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 16, Jan 1955, p13-14, 36, il
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Record #:
13329
Author(s):
Abstract:
An early traveler describes Native American Cherokee stick-ball through observations conducted in Qualla Town, North Carolina, 1848.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 16, Jan 1955, p16, 36, il
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