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4 results for The State Vol. 21 Issue 3, June 1953
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Record #:
13244
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Abstract:
A tug and a barge plied between Swepsonville, a cotton mill village, and Haw River for many years. Swepsonville is located five miles downstream from the Southern Railway bridge on the banks of the Haw River. By 1870, the town's cotton mill was producing to capacity and the problem was how to get the goods to the nearest railroad station. Manager G. Rosenthall and E.M. Cooke explored the waterway and found it navigable by flat-bottom boat. Later, a small barge was constructed by native craftsmen and the river was opened for travel.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 3, June 1953, p5, 22, f
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Record #:
13245
Author(s):
Abstract:
The outdoor drama was pioneered in North Carolina. The first was Paul Green's The Lost Colony. This season, which is from the last week end in June through the first week in September, there will be five of them - three in the Great Smoky and Blue Ridge Mountains, one on Roanoke Island and one in the Piedmont. The dramas depict widely different chapters of history from the disappearance of the English settlers at Roanoke Island to the sacrifice of a Cherokee martyr.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 3, June 1953, p6-7, f
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Record #:
13243
Abstract:
Judge E. Earle Rives of Greensboro Municipal-County Court has made changes concerning traffic problems. Any person convicted of speeding would have his license taken away for ten days. Rives also created drivers training courses in Greensboro High School, Wednesday traffic courts, and traffic schools for violators. He brought the first radar device for speed-checking in North Carolina to the Greensboro police force as well.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 3, June 1953, p3-4
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Record #:
13246
Abstract:
Jerry Ball, an employee of the Esso Standard Oil Company's North Carolina sales division in Charlotte, will do anything for a buck. Piano playing and fund raising are avocations of Ball's, as he puts on fantastic concerts to raise money, making him a local living legend in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 3, June 1953, p12-13, 23, f
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