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5 results for The State Vol. 14 Issue 4, June 1946
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Record #:
14553
Author(s):
Abstract:
The history of the Dismal Swamp Canal dates back to 1763 when George Washington conceived its charter conceived and conducted the survey. Constructed by slaves in the early 19th-century through a desolate, swampy area, the canal was was a vital trading link, connecting eastern North Carolina and southern Virginia. Improvement by Army Engineers included dredging in 1946 to return the canal to a nine-foot depth.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 4, June 1946, p6-7, il
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Record #:
14554
Abstract:
Before the Civil War, spring resort destinations were popular vacation spots for residents of the state. The most notable was Shocco and Jones springs in Warren County and drew visitors from in state, South Carolina, and Virginia. Visitors came to the springs either for health, rest, or pure enjoyment.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 4, June 1946, p22, 26, por
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Record #:
14552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Craigrownie was an abandoned industrial town in the Sandhill region near Aberdeen. The town, established in the late 1800s, failed both in developing a timber and railroad industry. What remained in 1946 were a few dilapidated homes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 4, June 1946, p3, 28
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Record #:
20744
Abstract:
The Royal Governor of North Carolina patented in 1764 a tract of land to John McDowell on Cleghorn Creek near Rutherfordton. From that point Griffin recounts the history of the land, owners, and home constructions. Dr. John Cleghorn built the mansion, from the best evidence available, about 1837, or perhaps earlier.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 4, June 1946, p8, il
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Record #:
20745
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Batista Ashe emigrated from England in 1727 and settled in New Hanover County. He was active in politics and was at one time speaker of the assembly for two terms. He was the father of two distinguished sons--John, a Revolutionary War general and Samuel, who was Governor of the state. The county of Ashe and city of Asheville were were named for Samuel.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 4, June 1946, p11, 18-19
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