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5 results for The State Vol. 13 Issue 40, Feb 1946
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Record #:
14592
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Abstract:
Helicopters, seaplanes, radar, and other technological devices will play important roles in lifesaving work from now on.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 40, Feb 1946, p12-13, f
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Record #:
20628
Abstract:
Alden G. Howell, Captain Company L, 16th Regiment North Carolina Troops, at the age of 105 is the oldest living commissioned officer of the Confederate Army. He is one of the last twelve Confederate veterans on the North Carolina pension roll. He is also the oldest living Free Mason and retired banker and lawyer in the country. A full-page photograph accompanying the article shows Howell holding a photograph of him in uniform taken during the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 40, Feb 1946, p6-7, por
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Record #:
20627
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This article relates how Sequoyah created an alphabet over one hundred years ago and brought literacy to the Cherokees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 40, Feb 1946, p3-4, il
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Record #:
20638
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Many of the roads North Carolinians drive on today started centuries before the coming of the colonists. Centuries ago woodlands and meadowlands were thick with deer, buffalo, and other smaller animals that made trails from one feeding ground to another. Later Native Americans would follow these trails. As the colonists began to arrive, these trails gradually widened. Usually they were dirt and in rainy periods could be almost impassable. Plank roads followed some in the mid-1800s, but it would be around 1900 before North Carolina began to take a serious interest in road improvement.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 40, Feb 1946, p10-11, 24-25, il
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Record #:
20639
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Abstract:
The Bingham family members were outstanding educators in North Carolina from the 1790s to the 1920s. Lawrence provides an interesting sketch concerning their activities. Founder of the Bingham dynasty was Rev. William Bingham, who came from Ireland and later founded the Bingham School in 1793. His son William J. succeeded him in 1825, and later by his grandsons William and Robert in 1857. Lawrence's article focuses on Robert who conducted the school alone after 1873.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 40, Feb 1946, p11, 19-20
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