NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for The State Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
14799
Abstract:
One of Orange County's more historical towns, Hillsborough, also nurtured industrial growth just outside its city limits. There were three large cotton mills located near Hillsboro, Belle-Vue, Eno, and Walker Brothers. Kennedy Lumber Company operated four miles north of Hillsboro in Yanceyville. Lumber company owner G. C. Kennedy also ran a nearby meat packing plant called Piedmont Packing Company. Another town near Hillsboro, Efland, claimed two industrial endeavors; Efland Milling Company produced flour and animal feed and an excelsior plant.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943, p16-20, por
Full Text:
Record #:
14798
Abstract:
Chatham County's industrial growth was centered in its two largest cities, Siler City and Pittsboro. Siler City boasted: a hosiery mill, feed mill, Hadley-Peoples Manufacturing produced yarn, Oval Oak Manufacturing was the largest producer of washboards, lumber companies, and furniture manufacturers. In Pittsboro the established industries were: Odell Manufacturing Company spun cotton yarn and Chatham Manufacturing Company made labels sewn into clothes.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943, p18-23
Full Text:
Record #:
14795
Abstract:
In early July 1943, Major General Edwin P. Parker demanded the men of his 78th (\"Lightning\") division test their skills at Camp Butner. Major General Simpson supervised the exercises relevant to real-battle scenarios. The men comprised the Twelfth Corps and traveled from Fort Jackson in South Carolina to Camp Butner. The activities lasted three days and tested everything from loading artillery to emergency medical procedures.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943, p1-2, 26, por
Full Text:
Record #:
14797
Author(s):
Abstract:
Furniture manufacturing was a diverse industry throughout North Carolina history. Henry Payne offered some of the earliest cabinetry work in Caldwell County. The first factory opened in 1880 at High Point, ten years later five more, and by 1900 44 furniture factories were operated. At the time of this article, there were 101 established factories located in High Point, Lenoir, Thomasville, Statesville, Hickory, Marion, Mt. Airy, Lexington, Mebane, and North Wilkesboro were the centers of furniture production.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943, p11
Full Text:
Record #:
14796
Author(s):
Abstract:
June 1, 1942 marked the first time African Americans were allowed to enlist in the Marine Corps. For 167 years the Corps remained segregated. A camp opened called the Negro Marine camp at Montford Point at Camp Lejeune, New River. Howard P. Perry, a native of Charlotte, became the first African American to enroll in the Corps.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943, p8-9, por
Full Text:
Record #:
19098
Author(s):
Abstract:
The furniture industry had a modest beginning in the state. The early colonists brought very little with them and what they built themselves was crudely done. Later itinerant-cabinetmakers, when travel became more common, moved from community to community crafting some fine furniture. Henry Payne was one of the most prominent of these men. The first real factory was built in High Point in 1880, and from that date the industry has progressed until now it is the third largest industry in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943, p11
Full Text:
Record #:
19097
Author(s):
Abstract:
Connor was a member of a distinguished legal family. He established a distinguished record himself as a lawyer, Speaker of the North Carolina House, superior court judge, and a member of the North Carolina Supreme Court--positions which his father had held before.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943, p5, 16, por
Subject(s):
Full Text: