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17 results for The Laurel of Asheville Vol. 13 Issue 12, December 2016
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29704
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A considerable number of areas in the southern Appalachian Mountains rank at the very top nationally for their conservation value, and many of these fall within Western North Carolina’s Nantahala and Pisgah national forests. To determine the amount of protection afforded to these lands, ecologists use four factors to assess conservation importance.
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29700
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Toe River Arts Council’s (TRAC’s) twenty-third annual Holiday Studio Tour will feature more than seventy artists in Yancey and Mitchell counties. A guide lists artists and galleries on a map of the tour. This is an opportunity for the community and visitors to meet artists where they live and work.
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29702
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Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center, in Asheville, North Carolina, will present two exhibits featuring the work of artists from Black Mountain College. The first exhibit highlights twentieth-century painters. The second exhibit exemplifies the independence and interdisciplinary qualities for which the school is famous.
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29701
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Sunnyside Inn opened in 1926 in Asheville, North Carolina, hosting distinguished guests, celebrities and dignitaries for nearly half a century. The inn was a sought-after culinary destination with an emphasis on southern hospitality and history. The historic home has been preserved and continues to live up to its legacy.
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29699
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Kathleen Turczyn, a former statistician, is now a renowned oil painter in Burnsville, North Carolina. Her current works vary in size, style and subject matter, including portraits of people, landscapes and animals.
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29706
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The Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians has the oldest living agricultural tradition in southern Appalachia, and saving seeds is an important part of their food ways. Some of the families in North Carolina who still save seed and grow Cherokee vegetable varieties are the Bradley Farm in Big Cove, and the Long Family Farm and Gallery in Murphy.
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Record #:
29708
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The Appalachian Barn Alliance’s project to document the historic barns of Madison County, North Carolina is often inspired by old photos of the daily activities on mountain farms. Photos show that the oldest surviving barns once had very different features and building materials, and reflected the simple building technology of the times.
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29705
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Andrey Medvedev owns the new Russian Chapel Hills Winery in Polk County, North Carolina. From 2009 to 2013, Medvedev planted seventeen acres of grapes and blended his first wines. Medvedev was also a soldier who served in Afghanistan, and to honor his comrades, he built St. Anna’s Chapel on the property.
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29713
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Arthur Morgan School is a nonprofit boarding and day school in the Celo community near Burnsville, North Carolina. This school uses a different approach to learning, one that is based on Montessori and Quaker values such as simple living and consensual decision making. The result is a progressive farm school where students live, work, create and learn together.
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29710
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Food cooperatives or co-ops emphasize independence and support for the local economy. Many co-ops, including Western North Carolina’s Hendersonville Food Co-op and French Broad Food Co-op, reach out to local producers and collaborate to create supply channels.
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29707
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Asheville and surrounding Buncombe County have over six-hundred eateries. It is the job of an executive chef to shape a restaurant through cuisine and culinary skills, setting menus, selecting and purchasing food, overseeing inventory and managing employees. Three local executive chefs discuss their job and restaurant experience.
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29709
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Mica, a cooperative, artist-run gallery in Bakersville, North Carolina, brings together well-respected potters from Yancey and Mitchell counties, each creating distinctive work. The pottery at Mica makes it possible to stylize a meal using locally made ceramic dishes and drinking vessels.
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29711
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The nineteenth century saw the proliferation of water-driven gristmills, liberating rural people from laborious hand grinding and providing community gathering places. Although automation largely replaced traditional milling, many mills still operate today, including the Dellinger Mill near Bakersville, North Carolina.
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29712
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The Mountain Gateway Museum in Old Fort, North Carolina has a new exhibit titled, Appalachia a Century Ago, Craft Through the Lens of William A. Barnhill. The exhibit showcases the work of photographer William Barnhill, who captured the process of making baskets from the bark of young poplar trees in the early twentieth century.
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29714
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The Collider opened in March in downtown Asheville, North Carolina as a place where climate service professionals come together to collaborate on innovation within the industry. The Collider’s location offers proximity to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency’s National Centers for Environmental Information.
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