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11 results for Tar Heel Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979
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Record #:
6259
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ray recounts the battle of Monroe's Crossroads, which took place on the morning of March 10, 1865, on land now occupied by Fort Bragg. The battle was one of the largest cavalry charges of the Civil War. Three thousand Confederates charged a Union encampment of two thousand soldiers.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p43, map
Record #:
6260
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twenty square miles of land in the Piedmont, touching Moore, Montgomery, and Randolph Counties, have become famous in recent years for reviving the art of traditional pottery. The first known potter was J. D. Craven, who settled there in 1857. Of the forty or so shops that operated in the region, only a half dozen remain today. Moose discusses the potters and their craft.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p45-47, il, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
6261
Author(s):
Abstract:
Julian Shakespeare Carr made a fortune off his Durham tobacco enterprise, Bull Durham Smoking Tobacco. He also built a magnificent home there, Somerset Villa, for the then enormous sum of $125,000. Webb discusses Carr and his home.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p27-28, 61, il, por
Record #:
6262
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joseph Wallace King of Winston-Salem paints under the name of Vinciata and possesses an international reputation. King has painted a number of portraits of famous people, including Queen Elizabeth II and Richard Nixon. He has even served as a legislator from Winston-Salem to the North Carolina General Assembly. Carr discusses King's life and work.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p30-31, 61, il
Record #:
6267
Author(s):
Abstract:
Valdese, in Burke County, was settled by Waldenses, French-speaking Protestants who came to the area in 1893. Ghigo summarizes their history in Europe and describes this bit of old Europe in the Carolina hills.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p23-24, il
Record #:
6270
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Town Creek Indian Mound, a state historic site near Mt. Gilead in Montgomery County, is one of the most important Native American sites in the area. The site represents the northernmost reach of the Mound People along the eastern seaboard. The authors discuss the activities at this on-going archaeological site.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p11-12, il
Record #:
35800
Abstract:
Faulkner revealed sources for the team names of several well-known colleges across the US. Included were state bird (University of Delaware Blue Hens), a Civil War regimen (Kansas State Jayhawkers), a type of tree (Ohio State Buckeyes), and Native American tribes (Miami University Redskins). The one she discussed the most, though, was the Carolina Tar Heels, offering three explanations for a team name that has also become a nickname for North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p48
Record #:
35797
Abstract:
Harry Golden’s twenty first novel was about to be published. The lesser known of his literary endeavors was a journal, initially a private publication but turning public after the end of WWII. Before its demise in 1968, The Carolina Israelite had gained an international audience, offering him a taste of popularity before his bestselling author career was launched with Only in America.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p17-19
Record #:
35801
Author(s):
Abstract:
He was a nonagenarian from Huntersville, touted as one of the last of his kind in NC. Included in Leon Berry’s profile were his inspiration for taking up the trade (his father), a description of basket making, their purposes (ex. carrying cotton). Concluding the profile was the extent of agrarian popularity for a trade that, in the Berry family at least, may conclude with him.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p49
Record #:
35798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wise proposed that logs belonged not in a fireplace, but on a homestead. To boost his argument that it was a viable residential alternative, he noted the speed in which a log cabin could be constructed (with modern tools such as a chain saw, it could be built in a month, that is). Added were its virtues as an efficient source of insulation and architectural source of rustic charm.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p
Record #:
35799
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard’s infamous reputation, gained from his pirate pursuits on the high seas, had preceded his arrival on land. At a town whose name has become intertwined with his, the shadow lengthened; a man’s name was added to his litany of victims.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1979, p37, 39-42, 67