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11 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 52 Issue 1, Fall 2012
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Record #:
18374
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Abstract:
Despite the 1783 treaty that ended the American Revolution, conflict between the U.S. and Great Britain remained. In 1812, America took a stand against Great Britain and declared war. During the War of 1812, North Carolinians played a large part in each stage of the war from the decision to declare war to the Treaty at Ghent.
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Record #:
18373
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Today, it is difficult to imagine the North Carolina coast in danger from a foreign nation, but during the 1800s the coastline was at threat to naval attack from European nations and the U.S. navy during the Civil War. The North Carolina coast thus featured several fort systems along the coast.
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Record #:
18371
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As the 1800s began North Carolina and its neighbors faced continuing conflict including confusion over geographic boundaries, war with Great Britain and Mexico, where North Carolinians played active roles in compromise.
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18375
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Forsythe County, North Carolina is named for Benjamin Forsythe, the heroic leader of the Rifle Regiment during the War of 1812.
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Record #:
18379
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In 1830 Congress narrowly passed the Indian Removal Act, which authorized the federal government to make Removal treaties with Indian tribes, but the Cherokee resisted. Instead of war, the Cherokee went to court. Despite rulings in their favor, the state of Georgia began distributing tribal land to state citizens. Due to increased pressure, began walking on what became known as the Trail of Tears. Although most moved west, a small group stayed in north Carolina.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 52 Issue 1, Fall 2012, p13-14, map, f
Record #:
18383
Abstract:
In 1898, North Carolina and the United States stood on the edge of a new, modern age. Conflicts involving race and politics drew much notice, particularly the Cuban Revolution. After the destruction of USS MAINE, the United States declared war on Spain; many North Carolinians played a role in the fighting, coastal patrol duty, and produced a number of heroes throughout the Spanish-American War.
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Record #:
18377
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In 1809, the U.S. Navy launched Gunboat 166 near Wilmington, North Carolina. It was the first of three small warships built in North Carolina before the War of 1812. Gunboat 166 was later converted from a sloop to a schooner sailing rig and renamed ALLIGATOR. It was activated for patrol duty in the Cape Fear River and protected American merchant ships from British warships along the North Carolina coast.
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Record #:
18376
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The battle between the two ships lasted barely twenty minutes. But when the smoke cleared, Johnston Blakeley emerged as an American hero. Considered North Carolina's greatest naval hero of the War of 1812, Blakeley and his crew commanded the USS WASP during their defeat of Great Britain's HMS Reindeer.
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Record #:
18382
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During the United States Civil War, General Braxton Bragg became one of the most hated officers in the Confederate army. Yet, this general has a major modern U.S. Army post named after him: Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Why? During the Mexican-American War, Bragg was viewed as a star artilleryman.
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Record #:
18381
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North Carolina native James K. Polk took office as the 11th president of the United States in 1845. Polk promised acquisition of territories in New Mexico and California--this led to a declaration of war in which many North Carolinians participated.
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Record #:
18384
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With the country in international conflict with Spain, President William McKinley issued a call for 125,000 volunteers to expand the small American army. Responding to this call, North Carolina formed three regiments for federal service. The newly formed Third North Carolina Volunteers provided distinctive--the regiment was made up entirely of black officers and enlisted men.
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