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8 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 40 Issue 2, Spring 2001
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Record #:
5199
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Born in Wilkes County, Tom Dula was a young man who enjoyed dating the ladies. Accused of murdering Laura Foster, he fled Tennessee. Captured, he was returned to North Carolina, tried, and hanged. Boyd discusses these events and the controversy surrounding them.
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Record #:
5200
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The Saluda Grade in Polk County, rising an average of 4.7 feet for every 100 feet in length, is the steepest standard-gauge mainline railroad grade in the country. The three-mile grade which opened in 1878, crests in Saluda. The line was built in some of North Carolina's most rugged mountains.
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Record #:
5198
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North Carolina had a viable iron industry in the 19th-century. Lincoln County was a thriving center for this industry, and by 1810 could boast six iron-making operations. Harpe describes the industry's rise, the men instrumental in it, and reasons it declined.
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Record #:
5201
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At 40,000 acres, Lake Mattamuskeet is the state's largest natural lake. Starting in 1837, numerous attempts were made to drain it and to use the land for farms. The attempts to drain the lake were not successful, and in 1932, the U.S. Government purchased the lake. Anthony describes the draining attempts and the lodge constructed there to assist in the process.
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Record #:
5202
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In Tarboro's Town Common stands a cotton press. A cotton press compacts cotton cleaned by a gin into a bale for shipping. Tarboro's press was constructed around 1850 in Edgecombe County and restored in 1976 during the nation's bicentennial celebration.
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Record #:
5205
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Weeksville, in Pasquotank County, was a major U.S. Naval Air Station during World War II and a major player in the battle against German submarines. Here were based lighter-than-air aircraft that patrolled the Atlantic, hunting German U-Boats. The base housed 850 officers and men and had two large hangers, one steel, the other wooden. The wooden hanger was the largest wooden structure in the world; it burned in August 1995.
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Record #:
5204
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Love Valley is the boyhood dream of Jetter Andrew Barker, Jr., who grew up wanting to build an old West town. In 1954, in the western North Carolina mountains, his dream became a reality in Love Valley. Buildings are required to look one hundred years old; cars are prohibited on main streets; and residents observe the Code of the West. Barker, now 76, has been mayor since 1954.
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Record #:
5203
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Judaculla Rock, a boulder measuring forty-eight feet around and covered with petroglyphs, sits near Carney Creek in Jackson County. The rock is the largest example of a petroglyph in North Carolina. How old the petroglyphs are, who carved them, and what their meaning is, is unknown.
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