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5 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 25 Issue 2, Winter 1986
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16148
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By early 20th-century, there were approximately 100,000 mill workers and many turned to music as entertainment and distraction from hard mill work. Musical groups would form either as bands within a specific mill or traveling bands would join and visit different towns throughout rural areas. Some of the more well-known bands were Charlie Poole with the North Carolina Ramblers, \"Girls Mandolin Club, and Pilot Mills Cotton Band.
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16149
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African Americans found musical and expressive freedom following the Civil War when they began to build their own churches. Hymnals merged with traditional African songs and created a strong new genre of spiritual expression. Some of the state's most prominent black musicians included Shirley Caesar, The Bright Moon Quartet, and the Golden Echoes.
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16150
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Throughout the mountains of Western North Carolina, craftsmanship collided with folk music to create a unique sound. At the oldest folk festival, started by Bascom Lamar Lunsford in 1928, one can hear the styling's of these artist whose folksongs not only provide entertainment but carry on traditional stories. Examples of the state's most famous folk artist are Marilyn McMinn McCredie of Asheville and Jim Trantham of Canton.
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16151
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Like folk music from the mountains, coastal music tradition preserves the history and culture of those living in the area. Fishermen and sailors preserved tales of adventure in music and some of the favored themes about adventure on the water, whether the ocean, inlets, rivers, or creeks along the eastern shore.
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16143
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Jane Hicks Gentry was born in Watauga County in the middle of the Civil War, December 18, 1863. She sang in the Keenersville Christian Church where she earned a reputation as keeper of traditional folk ballads, songs, and stories.
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