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10 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 16 Issue No. 3,
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Record #:
36182
Abstract:
The author gives the accepted definition of an antique as an artifact, made with human hands that is more than 100 years old. He elaborates on provenance, high-style vs. folk art, style, joinery and skill of the craftsman.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p2-6, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36344
Abstract:
Quiz Answered—‘The Promises of the Declaration of Independence Fulfilled’ by Robert E. Winters, Jr. Tar Heel Junior Historian magazine sponsored a contest for Junior Historians to give the meaning of an allegorical print representing social change in the 1870’s. No Junior Historian answered the quiz, so the magazine went on to give the meaning of the twelve points made in the drawing. There is an appendix giving additional information about the allegory given in the print.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p22-27, il
Record #:
36343
Abstract:
The author talks about early cars built in North Carolina. Gilbert S. Waters of New Bern, NC, built a gas driven car in 1900 and a second car in 1903. This second car was given to the NC Hall of History in Raleigh, NC in 1948. The author goes on to give a history of automobiles in the United States and then other early car builders in North Carolina. Two Tar Heel Junior Historians submitted their designs for a postage stamp commemorating the early automobile industry.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p18-21, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36345
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author writes about Phillis Wheatley, first Negro writer of significance in America. She was born in Africa about 1753, was brought into America in 1761. As a slave of the John Wheatley family of Boston, she learned English and could read difficult writings within 16 months of her arrival. Her first poem was published in 1770 and in 1775 she wrote a poem honoring George Washington. In this poem she referred to the United States as ‘Columbia;’ the first use of that word with that meaning attached.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p28, por
Record #:
36340
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses American needlework for its beauty and historical importance. She discusses how American settlers created cloth from wool and flax and used natural dyes. She talks of knitting quilt-making and applique, which American women used to tell stories with cloth and thread.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p15-18, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36335
Abstract:
The author gives the accepted definition of an antique as an artifact, made with human hands that is more than 100 years old. He elaborates on provenance, high-style vs. folk art, style, joinery and skill of the craftsman.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
36336
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author gives a detailed history of weather vanes since ancient times. A form of folk art, weather vanes also revealed something about their owners.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p7-10, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36338
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the most popular toys and their beginnings.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p10-14, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
36350
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heritage Day at Harmony, begun in 1972 as a culmination of the eighth grade social studies classes at Harmony Elementary, Harmony, Iredell Co., NC. Students, teachers, community people dress in old time clothes, bring old time crafts, do horseshoeing, churn butter, shuck corn, make pottery, have wagon rides, clog, chorus sing, etc., ending with a picnic lunch. The activities of the Harmony Junior Historians and other Junior Historians Clubs across the state are given.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p33-34, il
Record #:
36346
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author gives a tour and history of the Reed Gold Mine twelve miles southeast of Concord, NC.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p29-32, il