NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


12 results for Sea Chest Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978
Currently viewing results 1 - 12
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
29889
Abstract:
Margaret Wallace was fascinated with Portsmouth Island, North Carolina from the time she set foot there, and has been living there since she was given a lease on the school house from the state. While the Park Service maintains the buildings, Wallace provides a historical tour of Portsmouth from the 1750s on.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p22-35, il, por, map
Record #:
29888
Abstract:
Captain Ernal Foster helped his father catch sturgeon as a child, a tradition in North Carolina for many years, and Foster's father was one only a few men who knew the art of making caviar on the Outer Banks. Before North Carolina banned the setting of sturgeon nets, caviar could be made with a brine solution and sold relatively cheap.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p18-20, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29891
Abstract:
Oyster tongs, large wooden tongs with metal rakes, were used to gather oysters and pull them out of shallow waters. In the winter, when fishing was not always lucrative, oysters could be harvested with just a boat and some tongs. Up to 20 bushels a day could sell for up to $800 for the season.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p50-51, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29890
Abstract:
Damon Gray spent several years as a porpoise fisherman on the North Carolina Outer Banks. Men would gather in dories to surround the porpoise schools, and oil from the jawbones was used to make machinery and watches.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p38-41, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29887
Abstract:
Don Edwards is completing an inventory of Hatteras Island graveyards and the conditions of the stones. Although many of the graveyards have been overgrown--and some destroyed--Edwards is making an effort to document the graves and their unique tombstones.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p2-5, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
35998
Abstract:
Among Mrs. Cynthia Rollinson’s recollections of life were the lives she helped delivered as a midwife. As for life from decades ago, she could attest to a time when homes had ice boxes instead of refrigerators. She could also attest to a way Hatteras Island seemed futuristic, even in its dependency on kerosene as a light source: it had windmills.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p42-43
Record #:
35994
Author(s):
Abstract:
Toys common during her great grandmother’s childhood were rag dolls for girls and carved boats for boys. These objects had the role toys typically play in any culture: to prepare children for anticipated gender roles to take on as adults. As to another cultural aspect revealed, the toys reflected a time perhaps regarded as simpler by many younger generations.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p6-7
Record #:
35997
Abstract:
Moody Austin’s knowledge known was as a model boat builder and decoy carver. Knowledge collected included trips to Manteo that took a day, dirt roads, and cars as a rare sight. Those days on Hatteras Island were also part of a time when kerosene was the only light source, a schoolhouse accommodated children of all ages, and no businesses.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p36-37
Record #:
36000
Abstract:
Boat building was described by way of steps such as chime plank cutting and bending the sides of the boat and parts such as transom, keel, ribs, bow stem, bottom, and washboards. Accompanying the textual description were pictures of these parts. Included were pictures of the steps in the boat building process such as bending the boat sides and cutting chime plank.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p
Record #:
35995
Abstract:
Dr. James Mead of the Smithsonian Institute was on hand to help answer this question. The creatures that helped determine the intelligence level of marine life included beaked whales, porpoises, and bottle-nosed dolphins. As for the criteria used to determine intelligence level, if communication was a criterion, then the answer was affirmative.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p8-15
Record #:
35996
Abstract:
The post office could be defined as little by size, touted as the third smallest in the United States and second smallest in operation. It could also be defined in little in relation to its location, the village of Salvo. As for its distinction of being the oldest post office on the island, its reputation could be described as larger than life.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p16-18
Record #:
36001
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mrs. Maggie Austin’s story, people from small towns like Frisco and decades past could relate to. In her youth, common were one-room schoolhouses and schooling stopped at the seventh grade, traveling by boat and on dirt roads. For all the disadvantages focused on by younger generations and city residents, she asserted Hatteras Island to be the best place to live.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p48-49