NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


94 results for Recall
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 7
Next
Record #:
29137
Abstract:
Bruce A. Crissinger tells of his time spent as a prisoner of the Waffen SS. Crissinger the commander of Company A of the 823d Tank Destroyer Battalion on 16 December 1944. He was captured during the Battle of the Bulge while investigating the destruction of several tanks and was used by the Germans in a failed attempt to break through the American lines under a flag of truce before being rescued on 24 December 1944.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 2000, p5-6
Subject(s):
Record #:
21345
Abstract:
At age 17, Holt Thornton was a senior in Durham High School. Two years later, having dropped out of school, he was 19 and a veteran of the US Army Air Force, having flown 52 bombing missions over Europe. Alexander recounts Thornton's training and some of mission, including three on the Ploesti oil fields in Romania. He was discharged from Fort Bragg in September 1945 and started his senior year at Durham High School. His air group received a Presidential Unit Citation and he personally received the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Purple Heart, and the Air Medal. Today, at age 78, he and his wife live in Zebulon.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 2002, p19-22, il, por
Record #:
21189
Abstract:
John Henry Cooper left his wife, family, and job in Raleigh to fight for the Confederacy. He joined the 3rd Regiment NC Artillery, but was later transferred to Lt. Col. John Haskell's Company F, 13th Battalion, NC Light Infantry, where he served for the war. The authors used historical records to document this company's movements and thereby surmise the conditions under which Cooper and others like him served and suffered.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Jul 1995, punnumbered, por
Record #:
29147
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is written in response to the Fall 2004 Volume X, Issue 2 of Recall and contains some corrections. The author was a blimp pilot and was assigned to ZP-1 at Weeksville, NC. Overman discusses the altitude at which blimps can fly, how an airship climbs and descends, the maximum speed of an airship, the ballonets on an airship, and corrections to a particular historical event.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Fall 2005, p23
Subject(s):
Record #:
21343
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonel Willis Gandy Peace of Oxford in Granville County graduated from West Point and was commissioned in the Artillery Corps. Graham recounts the various positions he held during the period leading up to World War I. In 1918, he was promoted to Colonel of the 11th Artillery Regiment which participated in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. One of his guns in Battery E, a piece nicknamed \"Calamity Janae,\" is believed to have fired the last round of World War I at 10:59:59 on the 11th hour of the 11th month of 1918. Peace retired from the army in 1939.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 2002, p6, por
Record #:
21313
Author(s):
Abstract:
Samuel I. Parker, born in Monroe, NC, in 1891, holds the distinction of being the most decorated American soldier of World War I. He is the recipient of the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor, for his actions in the Battle of Soissons, France. He is the country's first military man to receive the nation's three highest military honors for valor in battle. He was a lieutenant at the time and later served as a colonel in World War II.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 5 Issue 2, Nov 1999, p12-14, il, por
Record #:
21288
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the advance of General William T. Sherman's army through North and South Carolina in the spring of 1865, it was opposed by a Confederate cavalry force of some 6,000 cavalrymen. The cavalry performed well in the field considering their need for more personnel, horses, and supplies. Brown recounts the movements of the cavalry, the discord between the two commanders--Generals Hampton and Wheeler, the fighting, and the success of their operations.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Nov 1998, p7-11, map, bibl
Record #:
21339
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Battle of Bentonville was fought on March 19-22, 1865. The battle can be divided into three parts, and this article focuses on the opening phase fought March 19 and the Union generals involved. The officers were William Passmore Carlin, James Dale Morgan, and Alphesus S. William. General Joseph E. Johnston was the overall commander of Confederate forces.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Spr 2002, p1-5, por, map, bibl
Record #:
29136
Abstract:
World War II’s the Battle of the Bulge, also known as the Ardennes Campaign, is detailed in three sections. The first section covers the stalemate between German and Allied troops in the autumn and early winter of 1944. The second section covers the background, strategy of the German troops, and the loss of life in Battle of the Bulge from December 16-26, 1944. The final section specifically looks at the 30th Infantry Division’s participation in the battle.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 6 Issue 1, May 2000, p1-3
Record #:
21642
Author(s):
Abstract:
Northrop recounts activities of blockade runners operating out of Wilmington, names of ships, and some of the famous captains of blockade runners and raiders, like John Wilkinson and John Newland.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Spr 2012, p13-17, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21446
Author(s):
Abstract:
Samuelson recounts the exploits of Colonel Robert K. Morgan of Asheville, who was pilot of the Memphis Belle, the first B-17 heavy bomber to complete 25 missions over Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II. At that time in 1943, squadron crew losses were as high as 80 percent, and those who completed 25 missions were sent home. Morgan later flew B-29s and completed 26 missions over Japan. Today, the Memphis Belle is in the Memphis Museum.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Fall 2006, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
21494
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonel Cathey was born in Waynesville. This article describes his experiences in Iraq during the 2nd Gulf War. He received the Bronze Star Medal for bravery, and Taylor includes the narrative which accompanies the award.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Fall 2008, p13-14, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21644
Author(s):
Abstract:
The group known as the \"founding fathers\" of the United States came from all thirteen colonies. Winstead recounts the life of one of them--Cornelius Harnett, Jr.--who is all but unknown to North Carolinians today but who deserves to be counted among them. \"He was neither a signer of the Declaration of Independence or a framer of the Constitution, but instead was one of those who aided the cause to resist the efforts of the British Government.\"
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spr 2013, p14-17, il
Full Text:
Record #:
21366
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham native Carter Billings served in the U.S. Navy Seabees and did two tours of duty in the Pacific during World War II. One was on Eniwetok and the other on Okinawa. In this article he recounts a Japanese air raid on Eniwetok. After the war he worked as an F.B.I. Special Agent from 1954-1974.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Spr 2004, p17, por
Record #:
21214
Abstract:
Sergeant Corbett joined the 2nd NC Infantry in April 1915 and served on the Mexican Border during 1916-1917. On his return, he remained with the regiment when it was designated the 119th Infantry, 30th Division. He recorded in his diary a soldier's view of fighting at Bellicourt, France, and other scenes of action.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 3 Issue 1, May 1997, p15-16