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3 results for Recall Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 2002
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Record #:
21345
Abstract:
At age 17, Holt Thornton was a senior in Durham High School. Two years later, having dropped out of school, he was 19 and a veteran of the US Army Air Force, having flown 52 bombing missions over Europe. Alexander recounts Thornton's training and some of mission, including three on the Ploesti oil fields in Romania. He was discharged from Fort Bragg in September 1945 and started his senior year at Durham High School. His air group received a Presidential Unit Citation and he personally received the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Purple Heart, and the Air Medal. Today, at age 78, he and his wife live in Zebulon.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 2002, p19-22, il, por
Record #:
21343
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonel Willis Gandy Peace of Oxford in Granville County graduated from West Point and was commissioned in the Artillery Corps. Graham recounts the various positions he held during the period leading up to World War I. In 1918, he was promoted to Colonel of the 11th Artillery Regiment which participated in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. One of his guns in Battery E, a piece nicknamed \"Calamity Janae,\" is believed to have fired the last round of World War I at 10:59:59 on the 11th hour of the 11th month of 1918. Peace retired from the army in 1939.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 2002, p6, por
Record #:
21344
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1912, the US Army sent a convoy of trucks on a 1,500 mile trip from Washington, D.C. to Fort Benjamin Harrison in Indiana. The purpose was to determine if automotive vehicles could replace the army mule. Captain (later Brigadier-General) Alexander Williams, a native of Cumberland County, was the leader of the convoy that tackled the terrible roads and winter weather in North Carolina. The overall route passed through seven states and took fifty days. Getting through North Carolina took three weeks. Daniels recounts the journey.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Fall 2002, p17-18, bibl