NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Popular Government Vol. 40 Issue 4, Spring 1975
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
18247
Author(s):
Abstract:
Budgeting--the processes of allocating the public's resources, chiefly monetary--is a principal function of any government. Over the last half century, North Carolina has experienced an interesting series of shifts of budgetary power from the legislature to the executive branch and now back again toward the legislative branch. This article examines some recent developments in the evolving legislative-executive relationships with respect to the state budget.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 40 Issue 4, Spring 1975, p11-17
Record #:
18248
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the standpoint of legislative procedure, bills passing through the North Carolina General Assembly fall into two broad categories: public and local. Local bills apply onto to those counties, cities, or other local units that are specifically named in the bill. Ferrell examines the state of local legislation in the North Carolina General Assembly and calls for some reform in its handling.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 40 Issue 4, Spring 1975, p31-35, 44
Record #:
18249
Abstract:
Turnbull and Drennan present statistics from the 1974 North Carolina general election regarding party affiliation, registered voters, voters by race and gender, and geographical connections to political parties.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 40 Issue 4, Spring 1975, p45-51, map
Record #:
18246
Author(s):
Abstract:
The modern North Carolina state legislator is the heir to a long and distinguished heritage that has evolved through the centuries in the life of the state. The current Constitution of North Carolina provides the legislator with a unique set of powers; however, their exercise must comport within certain bounds.
Source:
Record #:
18250
Abstract:
The prohibition of distribution of underground newspapers and other printed material on school grounds by students has raised a very difficult legal issue in the area of regulation of student conduct by schools. This article reviews the issues and definitions of what is permissible and impermissible and the legal ramifications.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 40 Issue 4, Spring 1975, p52-65