NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Popular Government Vol. 36 Issue 1, Sept 1969
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
17983
Abstract:
When the juvenile court was established in North Carolina in 1919, the clerk of superior court became the juvenile judge on a part time basis. Fifty years later many of the juvenile court laws seemed dated and inadequate; thus, the 1969 North Carolina General Assembly made considerable headway in changing juvenile corrections law including jurisdiction, detention, and custody.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Sept 1969, p58-65
Record #:
17982
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina local governments have historically enjoyed less freedom from direct legislative control than local governments do nationally because of the state's extreme reliance on local legislation in the General Assembly. This has caused many problems over the years until the 1969 General Assembly passed the home rule law that granted counties, cities, and towns more authority.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Sept 1969, p52-57
Record #:
17981
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1969 North Carolina General Assembly produced a large volume of legislation in relation to public schools. Bills ratified into law concerned textbooks and instructional materials, student teachers, and the development of public kindergartens.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Sept 1969, p39-48, map
Record #:
17980
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1969 North Carolina General Assembly made several significant changes in the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law in North Carolina. The organization of the state board was changed along with statues dealing with the transportation and sale of alcohol.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Sept 1969, p12-17
Record #:
17984
Abstract:
The 1969 North Carolina General Assembly enacted major legislative changes affecting public welfare programs. These included not only clarifying basic laws but also changing to the notion of public services rather than welfare and emphasizing work incentive programs, aid to families with children, and child day care.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Sept 1969, p78-85