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13 results for Our State Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014
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Record #:
22078
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Markovich recounts some events in the lifelong friendship between Russell Palmer and Charlie Daniels which dates back to the early 1950s in the town of Gulf.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p24, 26-27, il Periodical Website
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22089
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Old-time music played on fiddles, banjos, mandolins, and dulcimers has for decades attracted North Carolinians to festivals. Tomlin describes perhaps the oldest festival that was held in the Iredell County township of Union Grove in 1924. It now hosts two a year. A younger festival is the Bluegrass and Old-Time Fiddlers Convention held in Mt. Airy since 1972.
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22088
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Steven Miller, a carpenter and crafter of musical instruments, makes fiddles--unusual, century old-fiddles. Cigar-box fiddles have been around for a long time. Miller takes them and transforms them into fiddles he calls Carolina Fiddles. It takes forty hours to make one by hand, and he charges $750 per fiddle. He hardly makes any money off the fiddles, but as he says, \"I just do it because I really like them. I enjoy making musical instruments.\"
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p28, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22090
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Tomlin seeks an answer to the question--\"Is there a difference between the fiddle and the violin?\" He consults Jamie Laval, of Tryon, the 2002 US National Scottish Fiddle Champion for an answer.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p34, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22091
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This article lists a few of the towns around the state where a person can hear and also play traditional, old-time music--Elkin, Kinston, and Raleigh.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p36, 38-39, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22097
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Menhaden are not prized as game fish or food, but for industrial purposes. This fish, growing up to fifteen inches, was at the bottom of the food chain, but in Carteret County, it was the fish that built Beaufort. Menhaden processing began after the Civil War, and in the twentieth century about a dozen companies operated in the county providing employment for generations. The last factory closed in 2005. The industry is now gone, but what remains are the songs--chanteys--created by the workers--chanteymen--as they pulled in the catch.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p44-46, 48, 50, 52-54, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22099
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They are long out of date and they were large-size and not as convenient as today's GPS, but without those maps of centuries ago, people then would have been lost. Huler visits Jay Lester to examine his collection of original, highly prized old maps, some dating back to the 16th century. Huler discusses what can be learned about history and people from these colorful creations by the cartographers of the day and what the maps of today will tell the future generations about us. He and Lester make a visit to the Vault Room at UNC Wilson Library to see the map collection there.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p64-66, 68, 70-74, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22098
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Barbecue in NC divides between Eastern and Western style. Although Bib's Downtown does barbecue, it's neither of the two traditional ones. It's a potpourri of pulled pork, brisket, chicken, and other meats all flavored with owner Mark Little's own sauce--Bestern BBQ Sauce. Little opened his place in 2008 in the shell of an old Firestone auto shop of West 5th Street in Winston-Salem.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p57-58, 60-61, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
37944
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By 1862, North Carolina was divided by more than region. In the Piedmont and mountains, secessionists had control of the government. In the Coastal Plain, there was vast Union troop occupation, from major battle losses in Washington, New Bern, Morehead City, Wilmington, Beaufort. All over the state, chaos was also the victor because of conditions such as diphtheria outbreaks; guerrilla forces called “buffaloes”; Confederate forces that were intermittently organized; military generals seizing governmental control in the void of political leadership.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p214-216, 218-222, 224 Periodical Website
Record #:
37942
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How to improve the iconic boardwalk, destroyed twice by hurricanes and once by a fire, has been a problem inspiring many possible solutions since the 1940s. Over the decades, the issue has continued to be on any city election platform and inspired the creation of the Carolina Beach Boardwalk Preservation Association. The author infers the oft-asked question “what do we do about the boardwalk?” needs answering, since the boardwalk built in 1930 is as much a part of a Carolina Beach summer as the beach.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p188-192, 194, 196-199 Periodical Website
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37943
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The Lumina opened in 1905 partly to incite use of the electricity established in Wrightsville Beach. It became was a hotspot for entertainment and eateries with its bowling alley, restaurants, movie theatre, and ballroom for big bands. Post-demolition in the 1970s, its importance to the community came to light. Hence the Lumina Daze Festival celebrates what the landmark was chiefly known for, in an evening of WWII era music and dancing.
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Record #:
37941
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Williams Lake and Lake Artesia gained this status by becoming teen summer hotspots and concert sites for 1950s and 1960s music legends like Mary Wells, Eddie Floyd, and Jackie Wilson. Legend status also grew from being popular places for the Shag, a dance associated with a musical genre originating in the Carolinas during this time: Beach.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 12, May 2014, p183-184, 186 Periodical Website
Record #:
37952
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Proving quality hiking treks can be flat as well as uphill is Coastal Plain trails such as the Cedar Point Tideland Trail in Croatan National Forest. Here, hikers can find plants such as sea beans, possibly a yield of marshland and forest residing and colliding in their ecological co-existence.
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