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17 results for Our State Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007
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Record #:
8664
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Western North Carolina has the greatest variety of minerals in the country. Beginning in the 1860s, mica and feldspar were the money minerals, and North Carolina mica was considered the best in the world. One of mica's characteristics is that it is so hard that it will not burn. Feldspar is even harder. It can be melted but will not become fluid. Mining these two substances in earlier times involved great risk to the men who dug them from the earth. Unlike coal miners, these men are hardly mentioned in the historical literature, mainly because they were not unionized and didn't keep personal records. Haines discusses the men who dug the minerals from pre-Civil War days through World War II.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p30, 32-33, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8665
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In this continuing series on the best walks to take in North Carolina, Setzer describes a walk around Raleigh's downtown landmarks. The walk is approximately 1.6 miles and takes the walker by such places as the State Capitol on Union Square, the Executive Mansion, Victorian-era mansions in the Oakwood Historic District, and the North Carolina Museum of History, and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
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Record #:
8686
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Margaret Anna Robertson was born in 1810, and in 1831, she married the Rev. Robert Burwell. In 1835, the family moved to Hillsborough, where Rev. Burwell had accepted the pastorate of the Presbyterian Church. There she was prompted by local townspeople to open a school. In 1837, the Burwell School opened, initially for local girls. However, Burwell's curriculum for girls was progressive for the times and offered courses such as penmanship, geography, astronomy, algebra, chemistry, and philosophy. The boarding school soon attracted students from as far away as New York, Alabama, and Florida. The Burwell School operated for twenty years. During that time Anna Burwell was quite busy, raising her twelve children, teaching, looking after students boarding in her home, and being the wife of the minister. In 1857, they moved to Charlotte, where Rev. Burwell became president of the Charlotte Female Institute, now Queens University of Charlotte. Anna Burwell died in 1871.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p92-94, 96, 98, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8687
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In 1936, Addie Clawson of Watauga County was hired to carry the mail, typically a man's job. There were complaints from both men and women. The men complained because they didn't get the job, and the women complained because she was wearing pants and doing a man's job. This did not deter Clawson. She didn't own a car; she didn't even know how to drive. In the three days before she was to report to work, she and her husband bought a car, and she learned to drive it. The car would take her only so far on the rough roads. Her husband would meet her halfway on her route with a horse, and she would ride on. They would switch in the evening on her way back to the post office. During her thirty-year career, Clawson carried the mail on rough roads and through blizzards and floods. She retired in 1966.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p100-102, 104, 106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8685
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Harriet Ann Jacobs was born into slavery in Edenton in 1813. Kent recounts episodes in her life up to the end of the Civil War. When she was twenty-two years old, she escaped from her master and hid in the small attic of her grandmother's house in a space measuring nine feet long and seven feet wide. Jacobs hid there for seven years before escaping by ship to the Free States. In 1861, she published a book about her life, INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p82-84, 86, 88-89, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8684
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Charlie Sutherland is the founder of Charlie's Soap, which is based in Mayodan in Rockingham County. The company has been in operation for over thirty years and makes cleaning products that satisfy customers around the state and around the world. He attributes the success of the business to having a quality product and dedicated staff members.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p40-42, 44, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8695
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Jane S. McKimmon was the first director of the North Carolina Home Demonstration Clubs and the state's first home demonstration agent. She began work in 1909, and her job took her to many rural areas across the state. Her goal was to help rural women and girls learn how to improve their homes and their lives. Placing home demonstration agents in counties to work with farm women was part of her duties. She began with fourteen county agents and 416 women. Under her direction, the home demonstration clubs grew to 75,000 members representing all one hundred North Carolina counties. Once a year McKimmon would bring the agents to Raleigh for in-service training. As attendance increased over the years, the group needed their own building. Club members donated $2.50 apiece over a four-year period and raised over $100,000 in 1951 to help finance the Jane S. McKimmon Center on the North Carolina State University campus in Raleigh. McKimmon died in 1957, almost twenty years before the center opened in 1976.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p128-130, 132, 134, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8688
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Ruth Faison Shaw was born in Kenansville in 1888. She was a visionary artist and educator who rediscovered the ancient art of finger painting and took it to new heights. Shaw first introduced finger painting to the country in the 1930s at the Dalton School in New York. Exhibitions of paintings by Shaw and her students received glowing reviews, and she published a book in 1934 explaining her ideas on the technique. The most important aspect of her work came when she recognized finger painting's potential in the treatment of mental illness. Finger painting is now widely used by psychiatrists as a method to approach severely disturbed patients. Shaw returned to North Carolina in the 1950s and was a consultant in art therapy in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill until her death.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p108-110, 112-113, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8692
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In the early part of the 20th-century, fathers still taught sons how to run the farm, and few women worked outside the home. On Christmas Day in 1925, Ethel Turlington's husband died, leaving her a young widow with an infant daughter and the family farm in Johnston County. Pittard recounts the story of this determined woman who set an example for her daughter on how to survive and beat the odds. A self-taught farmer, Turlington used resourcefulness and frugality to provide for herself and her daughter, Hortense. She also worked as a bookkeeper for local businesses in Benson. As Hortense grew older, she entered into the farm routine, and at age 21, inherited two-thirds of the farm.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p116-118, 120, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8693
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In the 1950s and 60s, Hattie Leeper broke new ground in radio broadcasting when she became the state's first black female disc jockey at Charlotte's radio station WGIV. She spent twenty years at WGIV, before moving on to several other Charlotte stations. In 1973, she began a career of teaching communication at a number of colleges, including Johnson C. Smith University and Gaston College. She retired in 1998 and then ran her own communications school in Charlotte until 2004. She has received numerous awards, including induction into the Black Radio Hall of Fame in Washington D.C. in 1989 and induction into the North Carolina Association of Broadcasters Hall of Fame.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p122-124, 126-127, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8696
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Home economist Betty Feezor had a highly successful career as host of her Charlotte-based homemaking show on WBTV's Channel 3 from 1953 to 1977. Her friendly demeanor and delicious recipes endeared her to viewers of Channel 3. The show began broadcasting two days a week, but soon expanded to a full week. The show featured cooking, as well as sewing, needlepoint, and other homemaking tips. The Betty Feezor Show holds the honor of being the country's first television program to be taped and broadcast in color. Feezor was diagnosed with brain and lung cancer in 1977 and died in 1978.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p136-138, 140, 142, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8710
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Margaret Belva Mizelle was born in the town of Windsor in Bertie County in 1918. After graduating from nursing school in Charlotte in 1940, she worked as a private duty nurse. Before the outbreak of World War II, she joined the Army Nurse Corps and was assigned to the U.S. Army 38th Evacuation Hospital Unit. The unit went to England in the summer of 1942. In the fall of 1942, the 38th landed with the troops in Algeria and served in North Africa till September 1943. The 38th landed with the troops at Salerno in September 1943 and at Anzio, Italy in 1944. Mizelle recorded many of her experiences in letters now preserved in the North Carolina State Archives. After serving in Korea, she retired in 1970 with twenty-eight years of service and the rank of Lt. Colonel. Mizelle married Truman King in 1972. She died at the age of eighty-six in 2004.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p144-146, 148, 150-151, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8714
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In 1904, Horace Kephart left his job as a librarian in St. Louis and his estranged wife and six children, settling in the mountain wilderness of North Carolina where he hoped to recover his spirit and rediscover his gifts. He first lived in the Hazel Creek area of Swain County and later moved to Bryson City, the county seat. Two of his books, CAMPING AND WOODCRAFT and OUR SOUTHERN HIGHLANDERS, are considered classics in their fields and are still in print one hundred years later. In his later years, he was active in promoting the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Mount Kephart was named for him in honor of his work for the park.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p164-166, 168-169, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8716
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Franklin, the county seat of Macon County, celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2005. The town is nicknamed the “gem capital of the world” and is well-known for the mining of rubies and sapphires. Visitors to the town can enjoy a thriving downtown; museums, including the Franklin Gem and Mineral Museum, the Scottish Tartans Museum, and the Macon County Historical Society and Museum; and natural surroundings that include over 150,000 acres of the Nantahala National Forest and part of the Appalachian Trail.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p20-22, 24, 26, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8713
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Three women--mother, daughter, and granddaughter--create a timeline of expression in poetry, stories, dance and sculpture. They are mother, Pattie Vaughn White Holoman (poet); daughter Mebane Holoman Burgwyn, 1914-1993, (novelist and short story writer); and granddaughter Josephine Burgwyn Pratt, 1940- (dancer and sculptor).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p152-154, 155, 158, il, por Periodical Website
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