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17 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006
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Record #:
7682
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Devised by James Naismith in 1891 in Massachusetts, basketball was played in YMCAs throughout North Carolina by the end of that decade. Soon physical education professors at the North Carolina schools of higher learning began introducing the game. At Wake Forest, Professor Richard Crozier formed a basketball team in 1906, and in February of the same year, Wake Forest played Guilford College in the state's first intercollegiate basketball game. Other schools, including Trinity College, UNC, and NC Agriculture & Mechanic Arts, soon fielded teams. Facilities were poor. Players had to buy and maintain their uniforms. Spectators were few. The players persisted however, and the game gained a foothold on the campuses. Basketball was still second fiddle to football until the end of World War II. Then the sport took off.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p25-27, 28, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7681
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Plymouth, established in 1787, is the county seat of Washington County. At one time the state's second-busiest port, the town had its own light station. A replica of the lighthouse stands near the Civil War museum. The town was prosperous up to the Civil War, but the conflict left it in ruins with only eleven buildings standing. The town has undergone several economic cycles, and at one time twenty-nine buildings on the main street were empty. Now twenty-seven of them have been purchased for development. Things to see in Plymouth include the Port O' Plymouth Museum, a replica of the Civil War ironclad Albemarle, the Roanoke River Lighthouse and Maritime Museum, God's Creation Wildlife Museum, and The Garden Spot restaurant.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7684
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Reenactments of battles gained popularity when the United States celebrated its 1976 bicentennial. Reenactments started for the Battle of Guilford Courthouse in Greensboro in 1981. In March 2006, the 225th anniversary of the battle will take place with a variety of activities, including the reenactment. Cissna discusses the battle and talks with a number of reenactors.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p34-36, 38-39, il Periodical Website
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7683
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Michael Malone is one of the state's most prolific and best-selling authors. The Durham native and Hillsborough resident has produced eleven novels, a collection of short stories, and two nonfiction books. One of his short stories received the Edgar Allen Poe Award from the Mystery Writers of America. He was formerly the head writer for the TV daytime serial ONE LIFE TO LIVE.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p30-31, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7685
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Dodd describes Fremont's annual Daffodil Festival. The festival is marking its 20th anniversary in the small Wayne County town. Festival organizers seek to keep it a community affair by keeping commercial carnival activities out and encouraging local craftspeople and artisans to participate.
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7686
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Scattered across the state are hundreds of general stores. Many functioned as the hubs of their communities for generations. This pictorial essay presents a number of them, including their founding dates, locations, owners' names, and items sold.
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Record #:
7699
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Don Stevenson of Morganton builds birdhouses and feeders in his Fourth Creek Folk Art Studio. What sets his work apart from other birdhouse builders is the fact that his birdhouses are hand-sculpted, scaled reproductions of old buildings, barns, mountain cabins, and churches. His work draws raves from collectors, art critics, and book authors. His projects have included replicas of Paula Steichen Sandburg's goat barn in Henderson County and Payne's Chapel Methodist Church in Buncombe County.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p158-160, 162, il, por Periodical Website
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7700
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When the Civil War ended, Charlotte's population was around 5,000. Today, over 650,000 people live there. In the space of 150 years, the town moved from being a farming area to an industrial one and then to a modern financial center. Adams describes three places that give visitors a feel for Charlotte's past: the Levine Museum of the New South, Mert's Heart and Soul Restaurant, and the Mint Museum of Craft + Design.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p166-168, 170, 172, il Periodical Website
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7698
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Burke Brothers Hardware in Raleigh has been in business since 1936. The store began in front of the family's lumber mill. Part of it contained a grocery and butcher shop. When big grocery chains came to Raleigh in the 1950s, the store began to focus entirely on hardware. Burke Brothers prides itself on customer service and old-fashioned hardware knowledge. If a customer can't find what he wants at Burke Brothers, the chances are it doesn't exist.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p148-150, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7697
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Farlow describes two of North Carolina's forests--DuPont State Forest, which stretches across Transylvania and Henderson Counties, and Croatan National Forest, which lies in parts of Carteret, Craven, and Jones counties. Water dominates the landscapes of both forests with waterfalls and lakes in DuPont Forest and rivers and tidal swamps in Croatan. Each possesses a diverse ecosystem, one mountain and one coastal.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p130-134, 136, 138, il Periodical Website
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7706
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After time with the Army medical corps, banking, and Winston-Salem's Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, a chance encounter created in genealogist Mel White a passion for tracing African American family trees. He gathered data on Happy Hill, an historically African American residential section near Old Salem. This led to a major exhibit, “Across the Creek from Salem: The Story of Happy Hill, 1816-1952,” in The Gallery at Old Salem. In 2005, White left his job at Old Salem to pursue his in interest in African American genealogy. To date, he has built a database containing over 20,000 names.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p98-100, 102, il, por Periodical Website
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7703
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In colonial times, families were required to keep their own cemeteries. Visitors to Ocracoke Island marvel at the close proximity of the living and the dead, with grave markers just outside a front door, in the backyard, or just across the fence. Ocracoke has more than seventy-five small family plots, and since 1950, one big Community Cemetery. While most opt to use the Community Cemetery, state law requires only that the top of the coffin be eighteen inches under ground, and Hyde County has no law regulating burials. Even in the twenty-first century, backyard burial is still an option.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p82-84, 86, 88, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7704
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When Bill Floyd goes to a cemetery, he takes a clipboard, mirror, and laptop with him. His passion for preserving information found on gravestones earned him the nickname Cemetery Man. He began collecting and organizing this information in 1995. Since then, Floyd has documented material on thousands of tombstones in countless cemeteries in western North Carolina, including those in Rutherford, Cleveland, Gaston, Lincoln, and Burke Counties. The material is available on his website, which covers over 1,200 pages.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p90-92, 94, 96, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7708
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The New Hanover County Public Library's North Carolina Room was created in 1910. Since then, library personnel have collected material relating to the history of the area, the state, and the families that live there. The collection includes over 10,000 state and local history books, over 5,000 photographs pertaining to the region, 1,500 postcards, major Wilmington newspapers published since 1792, vertical files, and census records. The library's North Carolina Room is considered the most comprehensive collection of genealogical research materials for southeastern North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p112-114, 116, 118, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7707
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The Appalachian Archives at Mars Hill College contains a wide range of genealogical treasures. The majority of the collection focuses on families in western North Carolina. Other items include census records; a scrapbook on famed folk musician Bascom Lamar Lunsford; an extremely rare 1890s publication of the complete collection of the War of the Rebellion; and North Carolina newspapers on microfilm. The collection is expanding digitally to make the material accessible in the library or from home.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p104-106, 108, 110, il Periodical Website
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