NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Our State Vol. 67 Issue 5, Oct 1999
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4316
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scheduled to open April 7, 2000, the new North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh will be the largest natural science museum in the Southeast. The seven- story, 200,000-square-foot structure quadruples the old museum's exhibit space. The museum's focus will be serving as an indoor field guide to the natural diversity of the state. A featured attraction is the 112-million-year-old skeleton of a predatory Arcocanthosaurus, which is displayed nowhere else in the world.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4320
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two elaborate, privately owned hunt clubs, the Currituck Shooting Club at Nags Head and the Whalehead Club at Corolla, are reminders of waterfowl hunting times that began in 1857 and lasted into the 1980s. Both are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Currituck Club is the oldest active hunt club in North America. The Whalehead Club is now a museum and is owned by Currituck County.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Revolutionary War soldier, frontiersman, U.S. Congressman, and skilled orator, Felix Walker claims fame not for the foregoing positions but for the meaning he gave to a word in Webster's Dictionary. During the Missouri Compromise debate in the Sixteenth Congress, Walker felt compelled to give a speech and talk for Buncombe County. Soon afterwards \"buncombe\" came to mean speech-making to please constituents, or just plain bunk.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4315
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shelby, not Wilmington, is actually the birthplace of the state's movie industry. The industry began in Shelby during the 1970s and 1980s, when self-made millionaire Earl Owensby made thirty-five low-budget, high-action films on his sound stages. Owensby starred in most of his own B-grade movies, and though the critics panned them, the films grossed millions of dollars.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 5, Oct 1999, p23-24, 26, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
4317
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1870s, Beulaville, originally called Snatchette, prospered through farming and lumbering. When the timber gave out, tobacco and corn fueled the economy till the Great Depression. Recovery was slow, but in the 1960s, a manufacturing firm arrived, to be followed by other companies. Today Beulaville's available workforce and business incentives make it attractive to industries.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4319
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Writers' Network was conceived in 1982 by a small writing group at Guilford College in Greensboro. From this beginning, the network has grown to over 1,800 members, increased its budget, and started annual conferences for hundreds of writers, featuring seminars, workshops, and readings. The network also offers critiquing services, contacts, resources, and advice.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4314
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eighteen of the state's most creative and innovative museums, including the Appalachian Cultural Museum (Boone), Museum of the Alphabet (Waxhaw), Weatherspoon Art Gallery (Greensboro), and Exploris (Raleigh), are profiled.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4321
Abstract:
When Ken Walker was nine years old in 1970, he started selling his family's farm produce. Today, he owns Ken's Produce in Wake County. In 1991, he carved a few Jack-o-lanterns at his store. Around 150 people came by to see them. Over the following years he carved more, and the crowds that came to see the lighting grew larger. In 1998, over 10,000 people came during the two-night lighting. In 1999, family and friends will carve and light over 200 Jack-o-lanterns.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4322
Author(s):
Abstract:
Occurring against the background of World War I, the great influenza epidemic of 1918-1919 is one of the least known events in U.S. history. Yet in ten months it killed more Americans than any war. High Point was especially hard hit with ten percent of the population, 1,200, people, infected. A number of these later died.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 5, Oct 1999, p112-115, il Periodical Website
Full Text: