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7 results for Our State Vol. 66 Issue 2, July 1998
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Record #:
3757
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The state's military bases - Fort Bragg, Camp Lejeune, Cherry Point, Seymour Johnson, and Pope - form a powerful part of the country's military might. When an American presence is needed somewhere in the world, many of these units are first to answer the call.
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Record #:
3755
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The Lumina, built in 1905 by Hugh MacRae, was three stories tall, lit by 1,000 candles, and 25,000 square feet of fun, swimming, and dancing at Wrightsville Beach. Special trains ran from Wilmington, and it was \"the\" place to be up to the 40s. It was torn down in 1973.
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3754
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Swan Quarter, named for Samuel Swann, who settled in the 1700s, is a town most people pass through on their way to the ferry. If they stopped, they could enjoy the natural beauty; historic places, including one of the last ante-bellum courthouses still in use; and the Cutrell Inn.
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3759
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Marynell Meadors has been coaching twenty-eight years and is a big promoter of basketball - women's basketball. She has realized her dream of seeing women have a professional league. Meadors is the coach and general manager of the Charlotte Sting in the WNBA.
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Record #:
3756
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The Battle of Gettysburg was the largest battle fought in North America. Tar Heel troops made up thirty-two regiments, and one in every four soldiers lost in the fighting was from the state.
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3758
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Tar Heel gardens blaze with color from spring to fall, with plants including zinnias, sunflowers, black-eyed Susan, and hydrangeas. Knowing the soil and following simple planting tips can fill many gardeners' plots with festive colors.
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Record #:
3760
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Ev-Henwood, a 110-acre preserve in and along Town Creek in Brunswick County, was named for the Evans and Henry families, who owned it 200 years. Given to the University of North Carolina at Wilmington in 1991, it is a unique blend of history, colorful plants, and exotic wildlife.
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