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7 results for Our State Vol. 65 Issue 5, Oct 1997
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3513
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Weymouth, the Southern Pines home of novelist James Boyd, was saved from destruction in the 1970s, to become Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities. Over 600 writers have participated in the Writers-in-Residence Program.
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3512
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Statesville's unique approach to preserving its architectural heritage involves community groups and local artists working together. Initial funds to preserve local landmarks, like the 1911 railroad station, were raised by selling paintings of them.
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3514
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In operation since 1745, the Old Mill of Guilford on Beaver Creek in Guilford County affords visitors a look back to the time when gristmills, powered by slow-turning waterwheels, ground flour.
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3515
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John Branch of Enfield, in Halifax County, was one of the state's most active political figures. He was governor of this state and Florida, secretary of the Navy under Andrew Jackson, and a member of the state legislature and both houses of Congress.
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3640
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Doc Watson, from Deep Gap in Watauga County, is an internationally famous musician who performs country, blues, folk, and old Appalachian tunes. He is one of the world's best flat-pickers and has won four Grammy awards during his career.
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3638
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Normally found on Northern buildings, gargoyles and other grotesques decorate a number of Asheville's old buildings. Biltmore's construction contributed to this. Local citizens employed the mansion's European artisans to create similar designs for them.
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3639
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Seventy thousand of the state's 125,000 Confederate soldiers were returned to the state for burial. To date, 16,000 of these graves have been located. The graves are maintained in honor of those who died in the tragic conflict.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 65 Issue 5, Oct 1997, p38-39,41, il Periodical Website
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