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12 results for North Carolina Literary Review Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016
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Record #:
34660
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Abstract:
In 1931, Paul Green was asked to change the ending of his play by the directors. The old ending involved the murder of one white former sharecropper by two black sharecroppers after she married the wealthy landowner, while the new ending would spare her life to create a positive image of rising above the class she was born into. This change was originally thought to have been made to cater to the ideology that one can rise about their rank to attain fortune. However, Vines argues that the original ending depicted the real tensions between the white and black populations of the South after reconstruction, and the new ending ignores these issues.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p72-85, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34659
Abstract:
This article is a follow-up of Higgins-Harrel’s previous interviews with the five listed authors. All five writers live in North Carolina or write about North Carolina topics, and have different ways of telling their stories, whether it be story-telling under a spotlight, writing poetry or fiction novels, or theatre productions.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p42-70, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34661
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Abstract:
Why do so many writers come out of North Carolina? Ed Southern, executive director of the North Carolina Writer’s Network, attempts to answer this question in this article. He attributes the success of North Carolina to the Network, the “niceness” of North Carolinians, and the struggle between poverty and potential. He also states that in order to keep the title of “Writingest State”, North Carolina writers must encourage others to write the stories that they would like to write about, while demanding quality and perfection.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p92-99, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34658
Abstract:
Margaret Bauer, the editor of the North Carolina Literary Review since 1997, discusses North Carolina authors and their work. This interview focuses on what she believes has shaped North Carolina literature, themes primarily addressed, and the future of the North Carolina Literary Review.
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Record #:
34662
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jaki Shelton Green, North Carolina Literary Hall of Famer and poet, discusses the inspiration and processes behind her work. She attributes her recent writing to suffering several close losses, engaging in activism, and involvement in community.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p100-109, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34663
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Abstract:
Established in 1995, the Carolina African American Writer’s Collective (CAAWC) has transformed into a networking group for writers, both young and old. The CAAWC offers workshops for its members, networking opportunities, and the ability to share their work in a supportive environment. Much of the credit for the success of the CAAWC goes to founder Lenard Moore.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p110-114, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34666
Abstract:
This interview with William S. Price, Jr. delves deep into the relationship he had with his older brother and well-known author Reynolds Price. Discussions center on his brother’s relationship with his family, his sexuality, and his illness that led to paralysis and use of a wheelchair for the last half of his life.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p164-178, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34665
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Abstract:
Marjorie Hudson, a writer who moved to North Carolina in the early 1980’s, discusses the success of writers’ workshops and networking in the state. She began her Kitchen Table Workshops to allow small groups of writers to come together, share their work, and eat stew. In this piece, she offers advice to new writers, addresses what inspired her, and her process for creating literature.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p142-153, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34664
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Abstract:
This article pays homage to a little-known historical fiction writer named Mary Hancock, pen-name M.A. Hancock, through the eyes of someone who knew her growing up. Her stories often incorporated real historical events from the point of view of a young adult, and her unique choice of words and writing style made her a success.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p130-139, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34667
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Native North Carolina poet James Applewhite sat down for an interview with Rob McDonald. Together, they discussed how he came to be a writer, the themes throughout his work, and the sense of community that comes with being a writer in North Carolina.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p184-196, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34680
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Abstract:
Lee Smith and Jill McCorkle, both North Carolina writers, met in Smith’s creative writing class in the late 1970’s and have been friends ever since. In this interview, they discuss their relationship, their process of writing and critiquing, and humor is the most important aspect in their work and in life.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p200-215, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34681
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Abstract:
North Carolina hosts hundreds of different book clubs. These books clubs can center around a specific theme, such as North Carolina authors only and books about death, or are grouped by social, gender, or age range, such as male- or female-only book clubs. The diversity ensures that there is something for everybody.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p216-227, il, por, f Periodical Website