NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for North Carolina Literary Review Vol. Issue 8, 1999
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
6212
Abstract:
Robinson continues this series profiling North Carolina writers, as well as those who have written in and about the state. Included in this latest installment are Thomas Sewall Inborden, Randall Jarrell, H. G. Jones, Randall Kenan, and Horace Kephart.
Source:
Record #:
20200
Abstract:
North Carolinian Mary Bayard Clarke was an avid writer who published several poems and wrote editorial columns for North Carolina newspapers before the American Civil War. After the fall of Fort Fischer, Clarke was in Raleigh when General Sherman and his troops captured and occupied the city. Instead of fleeing, Clarke stayed in Raleigh and wrote many articles regarding the occupation of Raleigh for the New York serial The Old Guard. During the course of her research for the articles, Clarke had to interact much with the Union army and its soldiers. This interaction with enemy troops led to her estrangement with her sister and ostracized Clarke from several social circles.
Record #:
20198
Author(s):
Abstract:
Civil War reenactments have long been a venue for history enthusiasts and reenactors to express their interest and passion in the American Civil War. Civil War reenacting boasts over 40,000 participants across the United States, the majority of which are male. Recently, female participation in Civil War reenactmenting is on the rise as the role of women in the Civil War is being explored and emphasized more in academic and popular culture. This article explores the womens' role both in the Civil War and in reenacting by interviewing several women taking part in reenacting at Fort Branch, North Carolina.
Source:
Record #:
20199
Author(s):
Abstract:
Charles Frazier's novel, COLD MOUNTAIN, tells of a deserter from the Confederate Army and his journey home to his wife in North Carolina. It is considered one of the best American novels written since 1950. The story accurately depicts locations and events during the Civil War. By writing the book in real-time and in location, Frazier is able to express the depth of the main character's struggle as he travels home.
Source:
Record #:
20203
Author(s):
Abstract:
After the publication of Harriet Beecher Stowe's 1852 novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, several novels were written in response to highlight the pros and cons of slavery. One of the novels to tout the propaganda of slavery in the South, The Planter's Northern Bride, was written by Caroline Lee Hentz. Hentz was born a Northerner but lived in the South for nearly 30 years and adopted it as her home. Harriet Ann Jacobs wrote an anti-slavery book in 1861 which documented her experiences as a slave. Her autobiographical slave narrative, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, was originally meant to be appropriated for Stowe's next book. Jacobs was offended by this proposal and declared she would write her story herself.
Subject(s):
Record #:
20201
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina resident Richard Porson Paddison left the state as a young man and ventured North to find permanent employment. With the onset of the American Civil War, Paddison returned home to enlist in the Confederate army. After the conclusion of the war and at the beginning of Reconstruction, Paddison exchanged four letters with friends and family regarding his experiences in a rebuilding South. His letter offer an insight into Reconstruction from the perspective of the non-slave holding middle class.
Record #:
20202
Abstract:
After the American Civil War there was a movement by Southern archivists and journalists to emphasize and praise the Southern side of the conflict. Two Southern publications, The Land We Love and Our Living and Our Dead, were the vanguard of the resistance towards post-war Reconstruction and continued the verbal war for many years following the Civil War.