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5 results for North Carolina Literary Review Vol. Issue 7, 1998
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Record #:
6215
Abstract:
Robinson continues this series profiling North Carolina writers, as well as those who have written in or about the state. Included in this latest installment are Dennis Heartt, Hinton Helper, Archibald Henderson, Judy Hogan, and George Moses Horton.
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Record #:
20238
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Following the American Revolution, defeated Loyalists fled to the remote corner of Abaco in The Bahamas. Since then, the descendants of those Loyalists have maintained a population that is racially, culturally, and politically distinct from the other twenty-nine populated islands that make up The Bahamas. The Abaco population more closely resembles isolated communities on Ocracoke and Harkers Island, where the population still speaks with a brogue, resembling the tongue spoken by the earliest Scot-Irish settlers.
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Record #:
20237
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During the Great Depression, the Federal Writers' Project employed thousands of writers, editors, researchers and clerical workers to document and record the memories and impressions of American communities, with an emphasized voice given to the worker class. Of particular interest among the thousands of interviews were the personal narratives of Southern lay midwives. Their stories reflect a rich legacy of folk belief as well as their perspective on stresses within and from without their communities.
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Record #:
20235
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This article narrates interviews given by three African-American physicians from North Carolina who received their MDs between 1948 and 1957 before returning to North Carolina to practice medicine. All three doctors expressed not only the hardships they faced in attaining their degrees but also the racial discrimination they experienced while establishing medical practices within North Carolina.
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Record #:
20236
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A class on oral history, taught at East Carolina University in 1997, decided to focus its efforts on documenting the work and lives of teachers during the culmination of the class. This article narrates several of the interviews of teachers, most of who worked in North Carolina, many during the Civil Rights period, as they recounted their careers.
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