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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for North Carolina Home Vol. 2 Issue 4, Aug 1993
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Record #:
1456
Author(s):
Abstract:
Henry Bacon, designer of the Lincoln Memorial, used local materials and simplicity of form to establish the \"Linville Style\" as he designed homes and churches for Linville at the turn of the century.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Aug 1993, p34-43, il, por
Record #:
1455
Author(s):
Abstract:
Flat Rock was developed during the 19th-century by Charlestonians who sought relief from the summer heat. Modern development threatens to destroy the ambiance they created.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Aug 1993, p24-27, il
Record #:
1454
Author(s):
Abstract:
Habitat for Humanity is an international nonprofit organization that builds and finances homes for low-income families. North Carolina is the fifth most productive state in Habitat construction, and Charlotte has the nation's most active affiliate.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Aug 1993, p20-23, il
Record #:
1457
Author(s):
Abstract:
An old canoe house on Watson Lake, built in the 1920s by a Philadelphian and in disrepair by the 1960s, has been renovated into a private weekend resort.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Aug 1993, p56-61, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
1458
Author(s):
Abstract:
Orton Plantation, built in the 1730s on the lower Cape Fear, has witnessed 250 years of North Carolina history and is a standing reminder of North Carolina's heritage. The gardens are open to the public from March to November.
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Aug 1993, p63-67, il
Record #:
19331
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilmington native Henry Bacon was responsible for designing the Lincoln Memorial and, on a smaller scale, for creating a distinct log cabin style within the state. The Linville style, named for the town of Linville, is a distinct style of mountain cabins, cottages, and churches which uses chestnut bark shingles. The article offers a brief biography of Bacon's life and how his background and life in North Carolina influenced the 'Linville design.'
Source:
North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 4, Aug 1993, p34-43, il