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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 77 Issue 4, Oct 2000
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Record #:
21636
Abstract:
In 1870, members of the Ku Klux Klan murdered Wyatt Outlaw, an African-American town commissioner in Alamance County. The incident eventually led to the impeachment of Govern William Woods Holden over his handling of the situation. Outlaw was allegedly the son of a slave woman and Chesley Farrar Faucett, a rich white landowner. Outlaw was also a skilled craftsman, respected leader of the local community, a Union veteran and a politician. His murder was seen as a large setback for Reconstruction in North Carolina.
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Record #:
21647
Abstract:
This article examines how late 19th century Confederate memorial associations in Raleigh affected the commemoration of Confederate war dead. These organizations were created to found and care for permanent Confederate cemeteries, organize commemorative functions, and sponsor Confederate monuments. Women often provided the leadership of these associations, establishing themselves as capable of public leadership roles.
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Record #:
21646
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines Zebulon B. Vance's re-election campaign for governor of North Carolina during the Civil War in 1864. Vance was originally against Southern succession but by 1864 he was convinced that the Confederate cause was necessary for the continuation of the Southern way of life. His campaign was built around his commitment to Confederate nationalism and ultimately he was successful in his reelection.
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