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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 76 Issue 3, July 1999
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21577
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A look at The Carolina Political Union (CPU), a political study group founded by students at the University of North Carolina in 1936 to sponsor appearances on campus by political speakers. The university supported CPU, even when speakers chosen were controversial or too liberal - or sometimes even too conservative - unimpeded by the university's progressive and liberal tradition. Within its first five years, the group hosted nearly fifty speakers representing a wide range of the political spectrum, from the head of the Ku Klux Klan to President Franklin D. Roosevelt to labor leaders. The group declined with the onset of WWII, although it did continue to sponsor speakers.
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Record #:
21570
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This article examines changes and imbalances in the Southern social structure as seen through the lens of the antebellum gold mining boom in North Carolina. The first efforts to mine gold in western North Carolina in 1803 utilized slaves to search for gold, and expansion of the gold mining industry in the late 1820s increased the demand for laborers sending thousands of slaves to the mines. Slaves were then working alongside whites, thus challenging the basic tenets of the Old South's stratified society. Additional stress was brought by the introduction of white, foreign mine workers into several operations, further complicating the Southern class and social systems, particularly in the influx of a white, working social class that had no interest in slavery or slaveholding.
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Record #:
21572
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From the the late 1950s through the 1960s, the university members of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) became leaders in the struggle to integrate collegiate athletics in the South. This article chronicles the evolution of the racial composition of Southern college sports teams from the Jim Crow days of the 1890s-1950s and the total exclusion of African-American athletes, through a period when segregated Southern teams would play integrated teams from Northern colleges, to the period when Southern schools, under the leadership of the ACC and often under pressure from civil rights groups, integrated their teams.
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Record #:
21571
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A look at the Civil War career of Confederate major general William Dorsey Pender, in an attempt to provide new insight into the Army of Northern Virginia and one of its most important young leaders. Pender's role in several battles as well as relationships with fellow officers, the personal and state politics that complicated his promotion process, and the beliefs, opinions, and experiences of a leader who expressively proclaimed attitudes shared by many other Southerners in his position are examined.
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Record #:
21578
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This article examines potential causes for University of North Carolina professor Benjamin Sherwood Hedrick'a steadfast antislavery beliefs which, among other things, led to his dismissal in 1856. The university stated its reasoning for the decision came from its belief that the university was no place for rancorous political debates. Effectively banished from his native North Carolina, Hedrick worked for the US Patent Office in Washington, D.C., and never again lived in North Carolina on a permanent basis.
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