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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 70 Issue 2, April 1993
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Record #:
21457
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The second in a series of articles looking at the short life and career of prominent African American Joseph Charles Price, a contemporary of Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington who's untimely death, followed shortly by Douglass', left Washington as the United States' most prominent black leader. Comparisons between Price and Washington's leadership styles as race leaders to determine whether Price would have stood in contrast to Washington's accomodationist tactics. Also included is a look at how Price built Livingstone College to draw a more complete picture of the nature of black leadership and the course of race relations between Reconstruction and the beginning of the 20th century.
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Record #:
21459
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Abstract:
A look at the history of and controversy surrounding the 1944 publication of \"What the Negro Wants\" by the University of North Carolina Press as an example of racial paternalism and a startling instance of southern liberal hypocrisy in the prehistory of the civil rights movement. The publication was a collection of essays written by fourteen African American leaders calling for an end to segregation and dispensing with the idea of reforming the old system of race relations in favor of establishing a new one.
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Record #:
21455
Abstract:
A look at the establishment in 1742 of the Granville District, an area of North Carolina that was created from the consolidation of Lord John Carteret's (later Earl Granville) land claims totaling to 1/8th of the royal Carolina grant. Information on the establishment of the Granville District just south of the Virginia-North Carolina border, on its administration by various land agents, its settlement, its eventual confiscation by the state of North Carolina during the American Revolution, and the heirs' attempts to recover it are included.
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