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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 59 Issue 3, July 1982
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Record #:
21414
Author(s):
Abstract:
During World War II, blacks in America had high hopes regarding the 'Double V': victory over the Axis powers and victory over racial discrimination at home; this was articulated in a 1942 'Pittsburgh Courier' article. President Franklin D. Roosevelt had a less progressive version of 'Double V,' military victory worldwide and political victory in the United States. FDR appointed white southern liberal newspapers man Jonathan W. Daniels as presidential administrative assistant between 1943 and 1945 to accomplish just that. Daniels assisted in executing the policy and in the process, made some progress in decreasing racial discrimination against black Americans.
Record #:
21412
Author(s):
Abstract:
The issue of free silver coinage deeply affected the politics of North Carolina between 1892 and 1896. North Carolina Democrats opposed 1892 presidential nominee Grover Cleveland's 'gold bug' stand and when elected, he was blamed for the panic of 1893 and various other fiscal issues. In 1894, North Carolina Populists began supporting Republicans causing the defeat of many Democratic politicians. While both state Democrats and Populists supported the presidential bid of William Jennings Bryan, they ran separate governor candidates, which led to a Republican victory.
Record #:
21411
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1853, the first North Carolina State Fair was held in Raleigh so the North Carolina Agricultural Society could provide information to state farmers. The event quickly became an established social institution for state residents and farmers. During the event, military displays, public addresses, parades, political rallies, sporting events, annual meetings, specialty group functions, and social events all took place at the fair and attracted large crowds.
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