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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 40 Issue 3, July 1963
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Record #:
20885
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This article looks at schisms within Protestant denominations over the issue of slavery, specifically within Methodist and Wesleyan churches, and at how the contingent of membership and leadership in the South that opposed slavery carried on their organization and missions.
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Record #:
20886
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This article is a social history of entertainment in Raleigh in 1890 with a particular focus on music, church entertainment, parties, fairs, club events, circuses, picnic seasons, beach or mountain trips, dances and balls, African American entertainment, theater, dining, baseball, and beverages.
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Record #:
20884
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This is an annotated reprint of journal entries penned by historian and Unitarian minister Jared Sparks during his time in North Carolina. There are entries from a trip to the state in 1819, and from another in 1826 giving an account of his activities and observations of cities.
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Record #:
20893
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This article looks at the North Carolina 1872 elections-- only the second set to be held after the end of the Civil War--North Carolina's restoration to the Union, the end of the post-war provisional government, and the impeachment of Governor William Woods Holden who had been elected in 1868. An examination of political parties and factions within the State including the then newly formed Conservative Democrats, the Republican Party, the Democratic Party, the Whig Party, the Liberal republicans, African American voters, and the Ku Klux Klan are included.
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Record #:
20894
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This is a reprinting of council records from the State Archives of the Canton of Bern describing the deportation to North Carolina of a party of Swiss \"undesirables\" known as Bernese Anabaptists. The Bernese Anabaptists were criminalized for their faith in 1710. About 100 of these Swiss joined between 300 and 400 Germans in founding the City of New Bern under the leadership of Bernese nobleman, Christoph von Graffenried.
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