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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 37 Issue 4, Oct 1960
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Record #:
20431
Abstract:
In the presidential election of 1928, the Democratic party met an unprecedented defeat nationally, including serious losses in the South. In North Carolina, questions of organization and leadership were as important as debates on religion, prohibition, and Tammany; these and personal rivalries divided Democratic allegiance. Of particular interest in this was that Furnifold M. Simmons, U.S. Senator from North Carolina (and Democrat), refused to support his own Party's candidate for president.
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Record #:
20430
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Abstract:
Established in Charlotte, North Carolin in 1866, THE LAND WE LOVE is considered one of the best periodicals to spring up in the South after the Civil War. Edited by Gen. Daniel Harvey Hill, THE LAND WE LOVE commented on education, advocated scientific and practical methods for farming, preserved war records and memories, and provided literary criticism among many things.
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Record #:
20428
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Abstract:
During the American Revolution, the British came to North Carolina when the Colonial armies crossed the Catawba River and began the retreat to the Dan River. During this time, the arrival of British troops to the Moravian settlements at Bethania, Bethabar, and Salem caused anxiety and heavy losses in livestock, forage, and provisions. To provide for the losses, the acting Commissary A. Knect wrote reimbursement tickets to those residents who supplied the British with supplies.
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Record #:
20429
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In the decade prior to the Civil War, Piedmont and Mountain North Carolina newspapers were often a losing venture. Despite high subscription rates, newspaper publishers were forced to finance their endeavors in any means necessary to compete with Northern gazettes, delayed payment systems, and advertising scrambles.
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Record #:
20432
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Abstract:
A collection of letters written by or about tutors employed at Waterloo (presently Stovall), Granville County highlight the extent of North Carolina's dependence on New England teachers during the antebellum period.
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