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7 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 30 Issue 2, April 1953
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Record #:
20517
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This article looks at a laxity and indifference toward the enforcement of slave controls in the towns of Wilmington and Fayetteville in the colonial and antebellum periods. Geographic and economic factors are deemed to be largely responsible for the different views of legislators on slave controls, as the industrial and commercial concerns of both towns lead to high slave populations where slave owners allowed slaves certain freedoms like owning their own homes in town apart from their masters and no supervision or controls on the leisure activities of slaves. Legislators feared the potential outcomes of this behavior and attempted to pass laws to pass tougher slave codes with little to no success.
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Record #:
20533
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This is a reprint of a paper presented at the 52nd annual session of the State Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, December, 1952. This essay looks at the dispute between resentful forces of the Asheville community and author and Asheville native Thomas Wolfe over his first novel \"Look Homeward, Angel\" and its representation of the town. Wolfe maintained that the piece was fiction and that while he wanted to give life to Asheville, the town in which the novel is set, he did not include or characterize actual or specific citizens of the town. The people of Asheville, however, took Wolfe's portrayal of the town and its people as a criticism and an offense, and claimed that certain townspeople were characterized and identifiable. Further details of the conflict as well as direct statements from the author and reprints of critical reviews are included.
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Record #:
20534
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This is a reprint of a paper presented at the fifty-second annual session of the State Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, December, 1952. This essay promotes the genre of the Outdoor Historical Drama as North Carolina's latest achievement in, and contribution to, the restoration of Southern cultural pursuits during the mid 20th century. The author, Kermit Hunter, is a noted playwright in the genre and is the author of the 1950 dramatization of Cherokee contact with European settlers entitled \"Unto These Hills.\"
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Record #:
20532
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This is a reprint of a paper presented at the 52nd annual session of the State Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, December, 1952. This biographical essay looks at the life and accomplishments of Episcopal Reverend and Confederate chaplain George Patterson. Particular emphasis is placed on anecdotal details and personal accounts provided by the author.
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Record #:
20529
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This article looks at farming and farm life of the early 19th century in Iredell County through examination of an inventory of property and various deeds, bills, and letters concerning a 360-acre farm on Fourth Creek. Background information on the farm's ownership, on period farming tools, livestock, farm products sales and purchase as well as images of original bills and deeds are included.
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Record #:
20531
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This is a reprint of a paper presented at the fifty-second annual session of the State Literary and Historical Association in Raleigh, December, 1952. This biographical essay looks as the personality and character of popular North Carolina governor Zebulon Baird Vance. A black and white photograph of Vance is included.
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Record #:
20545
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This is the second and last installment of a reprint of the journal of young journalist Ruffin Wirt Tomlinson written during his senior year at the university, two years before his death. What little is known about Tomlinson's life is found in his journal pages, which is one of the only surviving accounts of the University during this period.
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