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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 27 Issue 4, Oct 1950
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Record #:
20058
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A continuation of the articles written to Johnson during Reconstruction by North Carolina citizens. The letters reprinted cover August 1865-November 1865.
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Record #:
20125
Abstract:
The author looks specifically at the administration of successive Salem College Presidents Maximilian Grunert, Theophilus Zorn, and Edward Rondthaler during the difficult Reconstruction era following the Civil War. Examining both the financial and social difficulties of the era, the article looks at how these three men managed to keep Salem College open during a period when other institutions closed.
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Record #:
20126
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The final installment of this piece, the first part appeared in the January issue of this volume and the second in July, covering the economic and social disparities between Federalists and Anti-Federalists participating not in the Hillsboro Convention as covered in the first two articles but the Fayetteville Convention of 1789. The author compares the two opposing sides in attendance but also the Fayetteville attendees against the Hillsboro delegation.
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Record #:
20123
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Abstract:
Following the Revolutionary War, Charles Pettigrew turned to agriculture to supplement his family's income. The reverend owned no property until his marriage to Mary Blount on October 29, 1778. From this nuptial he gained both property and slaves in Tennessee and North Carolina. Pettigrew established the Pettigrew Plantation in North Carolina acquiring lands in Tyrell and Washington Counties. The article summarizes the Pettigrew's development of the plantation and general history of the area.
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Record #:
20124
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Abstract:
The article looks at changing academic standards for the women admitted to Salem College. Beginning in 1854 with the first official catalogue, the author traces curriculum changes to 1909 largely through the changing administration. A major trend during this 55 year span was the modernization of the school curriculum by comparison to other similar institutions, a shift from the insular, self-dictated agenda of students in 1854.
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