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4 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 19 Issue 1, Jan 1942
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Record #:
19886
Abstract:
Benjamin Hawkins was born on August 15, 1754 in Bute County. He was a prominent public servant, representing the state both in the Continental Congress and United States Senate. This article covers but his time as a United States Indian Agent amongst the Creek Tribe throughout the Southeast. In part one of two, the author looks at Hawkins' life including childhood, family details, early Congressional career, and his appointments to numerous boards concerning Native American relations.
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Record #:
19889
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Abstract:
Letters to William E. Chandler during Reconstruction are reprinted here because of these highlight the state's political climate during this era. Chandler functioned as the Secretary of the National Republican Committee for the campaigns of 1868, 1872, 1876, and 1880. In this capacity, he received many letters from North Carolina Republicans stating their views on Reconstruction and politics both within the state and nationally. Reprinted here are letters from January 1868 through January 1878.
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Record #:
19888
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Abstract:
The General Court of Albemarle was a primary colonial court responsible for the hearings of all common law cases in the colony. Functioning between 1670 and 1689, all court matters were overseen by the Governor. The General Court heard both criminal cases and non-judicial matters; examples of both are reproduced here in the 1684 Minutes of this colonial court.
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Record #:
19887
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Abstract:
William W. Holden was an influential man of the state whose career has not been covered completely by historians. The author covers Holden's five-year career as the newspaper editor of the North Carolina Standard. During his time as editor, the paper experienced its greatest distribution in antebellum North Carolina and the author examines Holden's influence over the paper and its readership.
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