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4 results for North Carolina Geographer Vol. 3 Issue , Summer 1994
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Record #:
16891
Abstract:
In spite of progress controlling discharges of industrial pollutants, many urban drainage basins continue to suffer from heavy loads of sediment and pollutants. City governments and local environmental groups are attempting to restore natural vitality to such streams and wetlands through cooperative integrated efforts to reduce storm water borne pollution. This article discusses the parallel histories of stream greenway rehabilitation and storm water management and describes the ongoing process of merging the two goals in a southern Piedmont context--Greensboro's Lake Daniel Project.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 3 Issue , Summer 1994, p17-29, map, bibl, f
Record #:
16890
Abstract:
Most people would correctly guess that Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) originated somewhere in the Rocky Mountain region of the U.S. Even geographers, however, might be surprised to learn that the disease has long been insignificant in its region of origin, yet is increasingly prevalent in the southeast, particularly in North Carolina. This article examines the disease from a geographic perspective, looking at its history, cultural ecology, prevalence in North Carolina, and possible intervention.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 3 Issue , Summer 1994, p1-16, map, bibl, f
Record #:
16892
Author(s):
Abstract:
Albert discusses changing patterns of physician office locations in Asheville from a land-use context. In 1948, a thriving medical district existed within the central business district of Asheville, but in 1991, just a handful of physicians remained in this area. This article is concerned with the temporal and spatial sequences of this shift, and the role of land use planning on evolving patterns of medical land use.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 3 Issue , Summer 1994, p31-46, map, bibl
Record #:
16893
Author(s):
Abstract:
In addition to the natural forces at work on coastlines there is change being brought about by increasing populations. Where rates of development are rapid, we find that map revisions cannot keep pace and therefore we must rely on other information sources. Standard vertical aerial photography can provide very complete information about structures, vegetation, and coastal morphology.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 3 Issue , Summer 1994, p57-67, f
Subject(s):