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7 results for North Carolina Geographer Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992
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Record #:
16824
Abstract:
The HIV syndrome and the AIDS epidemic will be around for a long time. While many Americans feel it is mainly found in the gay population, the epidemic has now spread through all levels of our society. Disadvantaged populations, who have greater health and medical problems, and also less access to medical care, are more at risk of the disease. The authors give an analysis of the geographical spread of AIDS in NC, which began in the late 1980s, and focus on the linkage between the disease and social deprivation.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p1-10, il, map, bibl
Record #:
16825
Abstract:
A geography field trip is a first-hand encounter, after library research and statistical inquiry, with the complex linkage between the activities and artifacts of people and the physical environment--topography, drainage, weather/climate, and vegetation. The Haw River Basin was selected for this trip because of its long association with one of the Piedmont's prominent economic drivers, the cotton textile industry.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p11-24, il, map, bibl
Record #:
16826
Author(s):
Abstract:
The fastest growing segment of the American population is the elderly, and as many of them retire, they seek warmer climates. A number have relocated to NC over the last two decades, especially in Carteret and Brunswick counties. Bennett examines the characteristics of the retirees coming to these two counties, the areas they left and the reasons they chose NC, their economic and environmental impact on the two counties, and any concerns the retirees have.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p25-38, il, map, bibl
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Record #:
16827
Author(s):
Abstract:
Communities large or small deal with environmental issues every day. They are an integral part of land use planning, and how well planners and community officials resolve or mitigate them determines how land will be used. Cooper describes an approach to planning that integrates environmental considerations into the land use decision-making process.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p39-45, il, bibl
Record #:
16881
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation during the 1989 session that entrusted the regulation of minimal environmental standards of watersheds to local governments. The goal of this legislation is to protect surface water supplies from pollution by managing development densities, allowable land use, industrial and residential discharge, and chemical qualities of the water. Since adoption of this legislation, many local governments are turning to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for watershed identification and management.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p66-67, f
Record #:
16878
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economic Development has largely bypassed much of the rural coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina. Few industries requiring skilled workers and paying high wages have been attracted to the region. To increase development in this region, it is imperative that new economic activities be put in place. These activities must be compatible with the natural and cultural resources of the region. One such activity that many believe has significant potential to enhance economic development is aquaculture, especially catfish farming.
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North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 1 Issue , Summer 1992, p55-61, bibl
Record #:
16880
Abstract:
Imperatore and Wilms discuss North Carolina's involvement as a member of the National Geographic Society's Geographic Education Alliance Network, first designated and coordinated in 1986 by faculty from Appalachian State and East Carolina University to begin various activities to enhance and promote geography instruction.
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