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6 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 26 Issue 3, Nov 1978
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Record #:
16345
Author(s):
Abstract:
A particular area often acquires s somewhat macabre and mysterious character following a violent death. Such is the case with a spot in Ashe County, known locally as the Devil's Stairs. Not one, but two violent deaths are responsible for this sinister atmosphere. Although the motifs of legends about this place have generally remained the same over six decades, other details have changed quite noticeably. The economic and cultural development of Ashe County has had a close effect on the evolution of legends about the Devil's Stairs.
Subject(s):
Record #:
16347
Author(s):
Abstract:
Grayden and M. C. Paul were widely known for their teaching, storytelling, songs, books, and contributions to the interpretation of North Carolina's coastal history and folklore. The object of their work was to preserve folklore and folklife for future generations--to collect and study the lore, customs, and crafts handed down by those who lived on the shores of Carteret County for more than 250 years. They are also noted for their collecting and explaining North Carolina sea lore.
Record #:
16346
Abstract:
A wealth of folk material is stored in Bibles, not only family tree records that on occasion suffice for official documents, but also the treasured tidbits that one tucks inside a Bible because they had a special significance. From pressed flowers, bookmarks, and quilts patches, to pictures and locks of hair, Bibles present a treasure chest of folk wisdom.
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Record #:
35794
Author(s):
Abstract:
Based on Alan Lomax’s “cantometric analysis” of songs, the author uses that methodology to conduct his own study on Gullah church music on St. Helena’s island.
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Record #:
35796
Author(s):
Abstract:
A letter published by the Fool Killer, aka Jesse Holmes, aka Charles Napoleon Bonaparte Evans, was found. This one differs from the rest because apparently the Fool Killer had acquired the letter from one of his victims, and then passed it on to the newspaper editor. A picture of the letter is included.
Record #:
35795
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the mid-1800s, a house in Lenoir County was erected by Jesse Jackson, and housed the Jackson family line until 1976, when Simon Jackson, the last of his name, died. Simon Jackson was an eccentric man with a multitude of stories attached to his name, some of which are recounted here.