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4 results for North Carolina Archaeology Vol. 53 Issue , Oct 2004
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Record #:
18626
Abstract:
Ethnographic documents suggest that the total population of the Catawba Indians declined from 1700 to 1850 but then increased again over the next one hundred years. Sources reveal that while European-introduced diseases were among determinants of Catawba population change, emigration and other factors may have been significant.
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Record #:
18625
Abstract:
In 2001, the UNC Research Laboratories of Archaeology began the Catawba Project, an extension of the 20-year Siouan Project that seeks to trace the evolution of native societies of the Carolina Piedmont through the 18th and early 19th centuries. Documentary and archaeological research have exposed a series of settlements now known to have given rise to the modern Catawba Nation.
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Record #:
35209
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This article examined the warfare strategy Catawba employed to keep their cultural identity intact in the midst of English colonization and contact with these settlers. Described by the author as “ethnic soldiers,” this strategy yielded their place as highly valued military auxiliaries. Highlighted were activities that assured this value: assisting in curbing slave rebellions; fighting with British troops during the Revolutionary, Mexican-American, and Civil Wars.
Record #:
35208
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mark Plane’s study examined the Catawba’s resilience during their contact with English settlers throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In addition to adopting many cultural practices, this Native American group was able to keep its cultural identity intact. What the author focuses on, though, are the English cultural practices the Catawba adopted, reflected in the changes in their ceramics and eating habits. Underscored was the role that strategic alliances with the British through trade played in these social and cultural adoptions.
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