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3 results for Independent Weekly Vol. 23 Issue 48, Nov 2006
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Record #:
8398
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dorothea Dix Hospital, which stands on a high hill overlooking the city of Raleigh, was the state's first hospital to treat mental illness. The North Carolina General Assembly approved appropriations for the hospital on December 23, 1848. Today much of the land has been deeded away by the State of North Carolina, but a core section, dotted with dozens of interesting and historical buildings, remains. This core section is up for grabs, and the legislature is reviewing proposals of what to do with it. The problem facing Raleigh is whether the 306-acre Dix tract should become a great city park complete with gardens and meadows and an exhibition hall or two, or a lovely greensward that sits at the foot of a new and taxpaying urban neighborhood.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 48, Nov 2006, p43-46, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Underbounding is a form of residential segregation created by the land-use policies and practices of larger, wealthier, and predominately white municipalities that draw their boundaries in such a way to keep their neighbors out. Moore County is an example where African American communities including Midway, Jackson, and Hamlet, lack basic sanitation services and decent roads. These communities lie just beyond the boundaries of wealthier towns like Pinehurst and Aberdeen. Morgan discusses the progress to improve these communities that is occurring through federal grants and lobbying of local Moore County governments.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 48, Nov 2006, p11, 13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8397
Author(s):
Abstract:
Durham's Regulator Bookshop is celebrating its thirtieth year of business in December 2006. Tom Campbell and John Valentine are co-owners. A third partner, Helen Whiting, was also a co-owner from 1982 until she died in 1999. The store started as small storefront shop at 720 Ninth Street. It expanded into the upstairs in 1990, and in 1994, down into the building's basement. The owners attribute their survival as an independent bookshop to devoted community support.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 23 Issue 48, Nov 2006, p23, 25, il Periodical Website
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