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4 results for Endeavors Vol. 15 Issue 3, Spring 1999
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4173
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Bayard Wootten, born in New Bern in 1875, is one of the state's most famous photographers. A portrait photographer in her early days, she later traveled across the South, photographing the effect of the Great Depression, people of Appalachia and the Ozarks, landscapes, and architecture. Today Wootten's work is in the North Carolina Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill's Wilson Library. It is the largest photography collection there - taking up a twenty-foot row of bookshelves.
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Record #:
4172
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The demand for livers to transplant is great; however, donors are in short supply. Fifteen percent of those on transplant waiting lists die before a liver becomes available. For the first time in the state, doctors at UNC Hospitals used a new approach - a living-related, adult-to-adult transplant. A daughter donated to her ailing sixty-seven-year-old mother. Both recovered. Doctors say this technique will supply up to one-third of the nation's needs.
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Record #:
4174
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Nonnative plants and animals are gaining a foothold in the state and threaten the environment. Some were purposefully introduced, while others arrived on their own. For example, purple loosestrife was introduced as an ornamental in the 1800s. In wetlands, though, loosestrife crowds out other plants and can affect nearby duck populations because its seeds are not a good food source. While some nonnative plants are good, such as corn and soybeans, others can, without their normal pests and climate limitations, grow out of control.
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Record #:
4179
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After Hurricane Fran ravaged the coast in 1996, the UNC Center for Urban and Regional Studies studied ways to minimize coastal storm destruction. Among the 1997 study recommendations were purchase of high hazard properties by state or local governments for use as recreation areas or wildlife refuges and limiting governmental subsidies for construction in vulnerable areas.
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