NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Endeavors Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
26185
Author(s):
Abstract:
Climatologist Peter Robinson maintains that the media hype surrounding the so-called greenhouse effect has distracted attention from the real implications of global climate change. In addition to changing temperatures, Robinson anticipates issues related to wind, pollution, solar radiation, and rainfall patterns.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26187
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Conley, professor of law, and colleagues studied small claims trials to find out what litigants want from the law. They found that lay people are oriented toward their social networks and respond to social obligations, rather than legal rules. What litigants wanted most from the courtroom was the chance to tell their story.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p12-13, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26186
Author(s):
Abstract:
UNC researchers at the Cystic Fibrosis Center are developing a drug treatment that may curtail deteriorative lung disease, the primary cause of premature death in cystic fibrosis patients. The drug fights against lung malfunctions by hydrating the airways and reducing the absorptive process.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p10-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26189
Author(s):
Abstract:
Craig Melchert, professor of linguistics, studies extinct Anatolian languages. Anatolian developed from a language spoken by Indo-European people who moved to Asia Minor from north of the Black Sea by 2000 B.C. Melchert traces the linguistic history to understand how ancient people thought and lived.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
26188
Author(s):
Abstract:
Electric rays shock their prey using electric organs which contain proteins similar to those in human muscle. By studying electric ray proteins, physiologist Robert Sealock may learn why the human disease muscular dystrophy causes muscle cells to die.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p14-15, il, por Periodical Website