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5 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015
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Record #:
24732
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Abstract:
When pulled quickly from deep depths, many fish experience barotrauma. Symptoms of barotrauma include bulging eyes and internal organs protruding from external parts of the body. Sea Grant specialists and charter boat captains teamed up to develop techniques and technology to increase the survival numbers of catch and release fish that experience barotrauma.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24734
Author(s):
Abstract:
A team of marine biologists and researchers collected seaweed samples in Onslow County to study the levels of the toxic algae, Gambierdiscus, in North Carolina waters. The algae’s levels are much higher in warmer waters, so as water temperatures rise, tropical species like Gambierdiscus are migrating northward into nonnative areas. The toxins produced by Gambierdiscus do not hurt fish, but are harmful to humans. Studies like this will allow scientists to monitor the numbers of these algae populations and the potential risks as ocean water temperatures rise in the coming years.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p21-23, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24733
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Abstract:
In 2014 and 2015, ECU graduate student, Nina Sassano, studied the increase in jellyfish populations on the North Carolina coast. Her experiments revealed that an increase in the number of man-made structures in the water may cause jellyfish settlements to be more extreme, resulting in a higher density of jellyfish in coastal waters.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p16-18, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24735
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 2005, the annual Johnnie Mercer’s Pier Dogfish Tournament takes place in Wrightsville Beach. Anglers from all over the eastern United States convene at the pier during the last weekend of January in hopes of catching the largest dogfish. It is a relaxed competition and gives summertime anglers the opportunity to reunite during the winter months.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24736
Author(s):
Abstract:
Black Sea Bass is a species of fish popular in North Carolina. Student Ian Kroll studied the inner ear bones of these fish to determine the migratory patterns of juvenile Black Sea Bass. His research shows that most fish use inshore habitats but some still use offshore habitats for nurseries.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p31-33, il, por Periodical Website
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