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7 results for Coastwatch Vol. Issue , Early Summer 2000
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Record #:
4639
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Lundie Spence, a North Carolina Sea Grant education specialist, has been named a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Hero for 2000. The program recognizes heroes for their tireless efforts in preserving and protecting the country's environment. Spence has been with the Sea Grant program twenty-two years. Among her environmental efforts is Big Sweep in North Carolina, a volunteer effort started in 1987 to clean trash from beaches and waterways. The program is now in all 100 North Carolina counties.
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Record #:
4641
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In processing seafood for market, safety of the product is the prime concern. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's program, called Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point, and regular inspection of seafood factories by North Carolina seek to minimize these hazards. Green describes how these two programs work in the state's seafood industry. The law requires that before seafood can be sold, strict safety guidelines must be met by seafood processors and dealers.
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Record #:
4640
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In March 2000, the University of North Carolina at Wilmington dedicated its new Center for Marine Science. The 75,000-square-foot center has 52 research labs, greenhouses and aquariums, and a 900-foot dock on the Intra-Coastal Waterway. The new center will aid in the expansion of new degree programs and research studies.
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Record #:
4656
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Floods from Hurricane Floyd devastated Eastern North Carolina. Coastal waters were affected by an increase of nutrients and decreased levels of salt and oxygen in the estuaries. While the Cape Fear system was able to quickly recover because of a faster flow of water, the Pamlico Sound still has signs of stress. The long-term effect of the flood on these areas is yet to be determined.
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Record #:
4657
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The Outer Banks's maritime forests, including Currituck Banks, Buxton Woods, and Zeke's Island, provide groundwater storage and refuge for wildlife. Climate changes from north to south account for the variety in vegetation with cabbage palmetto trees on the southern end and deciduous canopy trees on the northern. Protecting the forest is a joint effort of local, state, and federal agencies.
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Record #:
4654
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Beach erosion is constant. To deal with it, the Coastal Resources Commission uses building relocation and beach renourishment (moving sand from others areas onto eroded beaches). Bulldozing is used as an emergency. Sandbagging is used as a temporary fix. Beach renourishment is controversial, and Smith summarizes the views of the public and environmentalists.
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Record #:
4655
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Smith describes the effects of Hurricane Floyd on the Brunswick County community of Oak Island, then discusses the Coastal Resources Commission's plans for redevelopment of beach structures in ocean hazard areas.
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