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21 results for Carolina Trees & Branches Vol. 26 Issue No. 2, April 2017
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Record #:
38970
Author(s):
Abstract:
James White, a Philadelphia native, was educated as a lawyer and a doctor. He settled in Currituck County and represented it in three Provincial Congresses between 1775-1776. In 1777, White represented Chatham County in Legislature and was a member of the Continental Congress 1785-1786. In 1786, he was appointed by Congress as Superintendent of Indian Affairs in the Southern District composed of NC, SC and GA. In 1789, White was elected to represent the newly created Hawkins County in the NC General Assembly. He died near New Orleans, LA.
Record #:
38971
Author(s):
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Cornelius Harnett, Jr., was a native of Chowan County, raised in the Cape Fear region and became a prosperous merchant in Wilmington, NC. In 1754, he was elected to represent Wilmington, NC in the General Assembly. After the Stamp Act in 1765, Harnett became a leader of resistance against British rule in North Carolina. Harnett was a member of the Provincial Congress, President of the NC Council of Safety, and elected to the Continental Congress in 1777. When Wilmington was invaded by the British in 1781, Harnett was captured and died from exposure in an open blockhouse.
Record #:
38972
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Hodgson, a lawyer, had a remarkably busy life serving as NC Attorney General, Assemblyman from Bertie County 1735, Assemblyman from Chowan County 1738, Speaker of the House 1739-40, Provincial Treasurer 1740, Judge of the Admiralty Court, and Commissary of North Carolina troops in the ‘War of Jenkins’ Ear.’ Hodgson married two sisters, Elizabeth and Penelope Pagett. Penelope went on to become a leader of the Edenton Tea Party.
Record #:
38969
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Abstract:
The author tells of how the Will of Benjamin Wilson, of Camden County, had not survived in the Court House; but that the Estate Record does survive. The Estate Record gives information about the missing Will and gives information about numerous descendants.
Record #:
38967
Author(s):
Abstract:
These are several items transcribed from a folder at NC Archives entitled ‘Certifications of Birth 1802-1889,’ under the file, ‘Pasquotank County Miscellaneous Records, 1703-1940 Account-Church.’
Record #:
38968
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Abstract:
The author gives a transcription of a letter dated July 11, 1847, written by Joseph Gordon and his wife, Elizabeth Granberry Gordon, of Hertford, NC, to their daughter, Jane Gregory Gordon Butt, of Powell’s Point, Currituck County.
Subject(s):
Record #:
38976
Author(s):
Abstract:
(Minnia) Inglis Fletcher , a native of Illinois, went to art school for sculpture and ended up being a leading novelist in North Carolina. She married a mining engineer and moved frequently across the country. She began her writing career when she lived in California. Years later, while on a hunt for her ancestors in Tyrrell County, NC, she became enamored with North Carolina history. Fletcher intended to write a twelve-volume Carolina Series of novels based on life in North Carolina from 1765 to 1782. She and her husband moved to North Carolina and purchased Bandon, a plantation manor house near Edenton, NC. Fletcher’s husband died in 1960 and Bandon burned in 1963, which drastically changed her life. The Carolina Series has been translated into seven languages.
Record #:
38981
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tom Blunt, was King or head Chief of the North Carolina branch of the Tuscarora tribe. He lived in the Upper Towns in Gates County, NC. He is credited for minimizing the Tuscarora War in North Carolina in 1711-1713. After the war, the NC Council recognized his faithfulness and good service and made him Chief of all Indians south of the Pamlico River. In 1717, the NC Council let the Tuscarora’s settle into a reservation north of the Roanoke River in present day Bertie County. Blunt died sometime before March 5, 1739. After his death, the Tuscarora nation petitioned the North Carolina Council to elect a new king.
Record #:
38977
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Willoughby first appears in the NC colony in 1669/1670 being appointed to the Albemarle Council. He held several offices and got caught up with the political upheaval when Thomas Eastchurch seized the governorship of North Carolina. Willoughby left North Carolina for a time and returned in 1677 to help lead the Culpepper Rebellion. When the Lords Proprietors re-established a new government in Albemarle, Willoughby was a member of the new council, Public Register and sat again as Deputy to Lord Shaftsbury. Willoughby remained in office until his death about 1684 in Perquimans Precinct.
Record #:
38975
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Abstract:
The Battle of South Mills, also known as the Battle of Sawyer’s Lane and the Battle of Camden, occurred in Camden County, NC on April 9, 1862. It happened after General Burnside took Roanoke Island, and he sent troops to blow up the locks on the Dismal Swamp Canal at South Mills, NC. Burnside hoped by destroying the locks, he could prevent the Confederacy from sending their small ironclad gunboats through the canal to the Albemarle Sound to threaten Union troops. After two Union forces got lost going to South Mills, they were attacked by Confederate forces in a three hour battle. The Union forces retreated back to their ships leaving a trail of destruction and mayhem.
Record #:
38973
Author(s):
Abstract:
Harriet Jacobs, born a slave in Edenton, NC, was taught to read and write by her first mistress. She composed her autobiography between 1853 and 1858, telling of her struggle against her oppression in slavery as a sexual object and a mother. She ranaway from her owner and finally was able to escape up North about 1842. In 1861, Jacobs had published her slave narrative, ‘Incidents in the life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself,’ which established her as an African-American activist and writer. She later became a relief worker among ‘Colored Refugees.”
Record #:
38974
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Clary, a native of Surry County, VA, moved to Perquimans County in 1776. In 1798, Clary built a toll float bridge across the Perquimans River at Hertford, NC. In 1809, Clary was charged for fornication with his step-daughter and yet he was also named as a delegate from Perquimans County to the NC House of Commons. He was elected two times, but the NC Legislature expelled him. The Perquimans County Court, of which Clary was a Justice, continued to appoint him to positions of trust. In 1822, Clary was appointed to the committee overseeing construction of the County courthouse.
Record #:
38978
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Abstract:
The Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal, measuring only 70 miles, was first proposed in 1728. In 1856, the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal Company formed by the merger of the Virginia and North Carolina companies to construct the canal. The canal opened in January 1859, was used heavily in the Civil War, and was continually used until it was sold to the US Government in 1912. During WWII, huge amount of military and private cargo passed through the canal in order to keep it safe from submarine activity off the coast of North Carolina. The canal is now a part of the Intracoastal Waterway.
Record #:
38980
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Woodard, a native of England, left there during the political upheaval of the death of Charles I and settled in Virginia. Woodard served as Isle of Wight Clerk of Court from 1656-1662. In 1663, he was appointed the surveyor to lay off the first Land Grants of Sir William Berkeley in the Albemarle region of North Carolina. While living in North Carolina, Woodard was appointed Surveyor General of North Carolina, served as secretary of the North Carolina colony and was a member of the Governor’s Council. He eventually returned to Isle of Wight County, VA where he died in 1676.
Record #:
38979
Author(s):
Abstract:
Anthony Dawson first appeared taking up a patent of land in Perquimans County in 1687. He soon became a Captain of militia, a member of the NC Council, a member of Assembly and attorney in Court actions. Perquimans Precinct Court was held at his house for a number of years. In Feb. 1697/98, Dawson was banished from North Carolina over the salvage of a wrecked ship for the Crown. He then settled in Gloucester County, NJ.